VLADIMIRETS Print
VLADIMIRETS I:     US Commission No. UA17250101
Alternate name: Vlodimiretz (Yiddish) and Wladimirets (German). Vladimirets is located in Rovenskaya at 50.51 º 24.20. The cemetery is located at center, Komsomolskaya & Pionerskya St. in forest. Vladimirets is 94 km from Rovno. Present town population is 1,000-5,000 with fewer than 10 Jews.
  • Town officials: Vladimirets Regional Executive Council of Vladimirets, Kuybysheva St., 56 [Phone: (03634) 21446].
  • Regional: Bureau of Memorial Protection Oblast Local History Museum of Rovno, Dragomanova 19 [Phone: (03622) 21833]. State Oblast Archive of Rovno, Moskovskaya St., 26 [Phone: (03622) 33004].
  • Jewish Community of Rovno, Shkolnaya St. 39 [Phone: (03622) 69993]. Shapiro Sunya Rulevid of Vladimirets, Vishnevaya St., 17 [Phone: (03634) 21775]. Israel of Yad Vashem.
The earliest known Jewish community was 17th century. 1939 Jewish population (census) was 1263. Effecting the Jewish Community were Khmelnitskiy's pogroms, World War I with last known Karlin Stolin Hasidic burial 1941. Antonovka (30 km away) and Zheludek (30 km away) used this cemetery. The isolated urban flat land has no sign or marker. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all. No wall, fence, or gate surrounds the cemetery. No stones are visible. The cemetery contains no known mass graves. A regional or national governmental agency owns site. The cemetery property is now used for industrial or commercial use. Properties adjacent are residential. The cemetery boundaries are smaller now than 1939 because of commercial or industrial development. Rarely, Jewish or non-Jewish private visitors and local residents visit. The cemetery was vandalized during World War II but not in the last ten years. There is no maintenance. Within the limits of the cemetery are no structures. Moderate threat: uncontrolled access and proposed nearby development. Slight threat: vandalism and existing nearby development.
Kirzhner Moisey of 263005, Lutsk, Grushevskogo Prospect 18, Apt. 38 [Phone: (03322) 34775] visited site and completed survey on 12/9/96. Interviewed was Volodko Sergey Arsenyevich on 12/9/96. Documentation: See section 14 [sic].
VLADIMIRETS II:     US Commission No. UA17250501
See Vladimirets I for town information. The Karlin-Stolin Hasidic mass grave, located 2 km from Zhovtino, was dug 28 Aug 1942 Antonovka (15 km away) and Zheludek (15 km away) Jews were murdered at this unlandmarked mass grave. The isolated rural (agricultural) flat land has signs or plaques in local language mentioning the Holocaust. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all. A broken fence with no gate surrounds the mass grave. 1 to 20 common tombstones, all in original location with none toppled or broken, date from 20th century. No stones were removed. The site contains marked mass graves. Municipality owns property used for mass burial site. Properties adjacent are agricultural. The mass grave boundaries are larger now than 1939. Occasionally, Jewish or non-Jewish private visitors and local residents visit. The mass grave was not vandalized in the last ten years. Local/municipal authorities did re-erection of stones and fixed gate. Occasionally, authorities clear or clean. Slight threat: uncontrolled access, pollution, vegetation and vandalism.
Kirzhner Moisey of 263005, Lutsk, Grushevskogo Prospect 18, Apt. 38 [Phone: (03322) 34775] visited site on 12/9/96. Interviewed were Volodko S.A. of Vlodimirets on 12/9/96. Kirzhner completed survey on 12/09/1996. Documentation: See section 14 [sic].
A memorial site outside of town is where Jews were murdered. There is a memorial stone at the site that states in Ukrainian or Russian and in Hebrew: "Stand and pay attention to this place. Here on August 28, 1942 Nazis occupiers martyred more than 3,000 Soviet citizens. History will not forget or forgive them and their barbaric actions. May the victims rest in peace." The cemetery is now where the center of town is. After the war, the Communists built a government building on the site. All that remains is a grassy yard. There is no marker. Source: Stan Oshinsky, JGSGW. He visited June 1-4, 1997. [date?]