KIYEV/KIEV/KYYIV, BABI YAR Print

Alternate names: Kyyiv [Ukr], Kiev [Rus, Yid], Kijów [Pol], Kijew [Ger], Kyïv, Kief, Kiyev, Kiew, Russian: Киeв. Ukrainian: Киïв. קיִעװ-Yiddish. 2003 Jewish population: about 100,000 of3 million total population. Pre-Holocaust Jewish population: 140,256. 50°26' N, 30°31' E. Ukraine's capitol.

KehilaLink. [May 2012]

On September 29 and 30, 1941, in a ravine outside of Kiev, 33,771 Jews were murdered. Before their 1943 retreat, the Nazis forced the BabiYar concentration camp inmates to burn all corpses. Then, they were murdered. The total death count is more than 70,000 Jews plus almost a quarter million non-Jews. Today, Babi Yar site has a main highway across it with a housing estate and a television center. Source: by Freedman, Warren. World Guide for the Jewish Traveler, NY: E.P. Dutton Inc, 1984. Extracted by Bernard Kouchel; JGS of Broward Co., Florida; March 1994.

KIYEV/KIEV, BABI YAR:
On September 29 and 30, 1941, in a ravine outside of Kiev, 33,771 Jews were murdered. Before their 1943 retreat, the Nazis forced the BabiYar concentration camp inmates to burn all corpses. Then, they were murdered. The total death count is more than 70,000 Jews plus almost a quarter million non-Jews. Today, Babi Yar site has a main highway across it with a housing estate and a television center. Source: by Freedman, Warren. World Guide for the Jewish Traveler, NY: E.P. Dutton Inc, 1984. Extracted by Bernard Kouchel; JGS of Broward Co., Florida; March 1994.

KIYEV: used cemetery at Skvira (US Commission No. UA09340101); used the cemetery at Pereyaslav-Khmelnitskiy. Kiev Jewish Community [Phone: (044) 4162442]. Also see RAKITNOE.

  • KIYEV I:     US Commission No. UA09010101
  • Alternate names: Kijow (Yiddish), Kjew (Polish), Kiev (Russian) and Kijew (Ukraine). The cemetery is located at Volkovskogo Street 19. The town is located at 50º26 30º31, 189 km from Uman. Present town population is over 100,000 with over 10,000 Jews.
  • The earliest known Jewish community was 10th century. 1939 Jewish population was 14,0256. The Jewish cemetery was established in 1925. Rabbin Tsuhak Shehtman (1953) is buried here. The last known Jewish burial was in 1957. No other towns or villages used this unlandmarked Hasidic and Progressive/Reform cemetery. The urban flat land, part of a municipal cemetery, has no sign or marker. Reached by "other," access is open to all. A continuous fence with non-locking gate surrounds site. The approximate size of cemetery before WWII and now is 3.80 hectares. More than 5000 stones, most in original location, date from 1925. No stones were removed. Some tombstones have traces of painting on their surfaces, iron decorations or lettering, other metallic elements, portraits on stones, and/or metal fences around graves. The cemetery contains no known mass graves. The municipality owns the site used for "other." Adjacent properties are residential and other. The cemetery boundaries are unchanged since 1939. Occasionally, Jewish or non-Jewish private visitors and local residents stop. The cemetery was vandalized occasionally in the last ten years. Local/municipal authorities and Jewish individuals within country did re-erection of stones and cleared vegetation. The government pays the regular caretaker. Within the limits of the cemetery is a pre-burial house house with a catafalque and a chimney and an ohel. Moderate threat: uncontrolled access, pollution, vegetation (a seasonal problem, preventing access) and vandalism. Slight threat: weather erosion, existing nearby development and proposed nearby development.
  • Kalnitskiy Mihail Borisovich of Kiev, 50 Melnikova Street 6, apt. 67 [Phone: (044) 2769460] visited site in 1990 and 1994. No interviews were conducted. He completed survey on 08/21/1994.
  • KIYEV II:     US Commission No. UA09010103
  • The cemetery is located at Stetsenko Street. 18. The Jewish cemetery was established in 1958 with last known Hasidic or Progressive/Reform Jewish burial in 1994. No other towns or villages used this unlandmarked cemetery. The suburban flat land, part of a municipal cemetery, marked by signs in other languages. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all. A continuous fence with non-locking gate surrounds site. More than 5000 stones, most in original location with less than 25% of surviving stones toppled or broken, date from 19th to 20th century. No stones were removed. Some tombstones have iron decorations or lettering, with bronze decorations or lettering, with other metallic elements, portraits on stones, and/or metal fences around graves. The cemetery contains no known mass graves. The municipality owns the site used for recreational use ((park, playground, and sports) and industrial or commercial use. Adjacent properties are agricultural and residential. The cemetery boundaries is larger now than 1939. Frequently, organized Jewish tour or pilgrimage groups, Jewish or non-Jewish private visitors and local residents visit. The cemetery was vandalized occasionally in the last ten years. Local/municipal authorities cleaned stones and cleared vegetation 1965-1994. The Jewish Congregation and Jewish survivors pay the regular caretaker. Within the limits of the cemetery is a pre-burial house house with a catafalque and a chimney, more than one ohel and other structures. Vegetation overgrowth is a seasonal problem, preventing access. Water drainage at the cemetery is a seasonal problem. Moderate threat: uncontrolled access, weather erosion, pollution and proposed nearby development. Slight threat: vandalism and existing nearby development.
  • Kalnitskiy Mihail Borisovich of Kiev-50, Melnikova Street 6, Apt. 67 [Phone: (044) 2769460] visited site in 1993 and 1994. Kalnitskiy completed survey on 08/14/1994. No interviews were conducted.
  • KIYEV III:     US Commission No. UA09010104
  • The cemetery is located at Timiryazevskaya Street. The last known Hasidic, Conservative or Progressive/Reform Jewish burial was begining 20 (?). No other towns or villages used this unlandmarked cemetery. The isolated urban hillside has no sign or marker. Reached by crossing other public property, access is open to all. No wall, fence, or gate surrounds site. No stones are visible. Location of any removed tombstones is unknown. The cemetery contains no known mass graves. A regional or national governmental agency owns site used for "other." Adjacent properties are recreational and residential. The cemetery boundaries are smaller now than 1939. Within the limits of the cemetery are no structures. Very serious threat: vegetation.
  • Kalnitskiy Mihail Borisovich of Kiev-50, Melnikova Street 6, Apt. 67 [Phone: (044) 2769460] visited site on 8/14/94. No interviews were conducted. Kalnitskiy completed survey on 08/21/1994.
  • KIYEV IV:     US Commission No. UA09010102
  • The cemetery is located at Melnikova Street 44. The Jewish cemetery was established in 1892 with last known Hasidic, Conservative, Progressive/Reform or Karaimskaya Jewish burial in 1949. No other towns or villages used this unlandmarked isolated urban flat land on a hillside with no sign or marker. Reached by turning directly off a public road and other, access is open to all. A continuous fence with no gate surrounds site. 1 to 20 stones, with than 75% of surviving stones toppled or broken, date from 1920. Stones were removed to another cemetery. The cemetery has no special sections. Some tombstones have metal fences around graves. The cemetery contains no known mass graves. The local Jewish community and the municipality own the site used for recreation (park, playground, and sports) and industrial or commercial use. Adjacent properties are recreational and residential. The cemetery boundaries are smaller now than 1939 because of housing development, commercial-industrial development and other. The cemetery is visited rarely by organized individual tours, Jewish or non-Jewish private visitors and local residents. The cemetery was vandalized during World War II but not in the last ten years. There is no maintenance. Within the limits of the cemetery is a pre-burial house. Vegetation overgrowth is a constant problem, disturbing both graves and stones. Very serious threat: vegetation, existing nearby development and proposed nearby development. Moderate threat: uncontrolled access. Slight threat: vandalism.
  • Kalnitskiy Mihail Borisovich of Kiev-50, Melnikova Street 6, Apt. 67 [Phone: (044) 2769460] visited site and completed survey on 8/14/94. No interviews were conducted.
  • KIYEV V:     US Commission No. UA09010501
  • The mass grave is located at Volkovskogo Street. Living here were Rabbi David of Skvira, son of Rabbi Jatzchak (Rabbi of Skvira), and Shlomo Ben-Zion (son of Shaya Zesha). The unlandmarked Jewish mass grave was dug in 1941. No Jews from other towns or villages were murdered here. The isolated urban hillside has Jewish symbols on gate or wall. The marker mentions the Holocaust. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all. No wall, fence, or gate surrounds the mass grave. 1 to 20 stones, all in original location with none toppled or broken and no stones removed, date from 1989. Some tombstones have traces of painting on their surfaces, with iron decorations or lettering and with bronze decorations or lettering. The site contains marked mass graves. The municipality owns the property. Adjacent properties are recreational, residential and other. Frequently, organized Jewish group tours or pilgrimage groups, organized individual tours, Jewish or non-Jewish private visitors and local residents visit. The mass grave not was vandalized in the last ten years. Local/municipal authorities erected stones in 1989. Now, authorities occasionally clean or clear site. Within the limits of the mass grave are no structures. Vegetation overgrowth is a constant problem, disturbing graves. Water drainage at the mass grave is a seasonal problem. Very serious threat: vegetation. Serious threat: weather erosion. Moderate threat: uncontrolled access. Slight threat: pollution and vandalism.
  • Shwartz Yulia Nikolayevna of 253152, Kiev, Buchmy Street 5/1, apt.8 [Phone: (044) 5503228] visited site and completed survey on 24/04/1995. A person interviewed for this survey was Klara Vinokur on 24/04/1995. Other documentation exists but was inaccessible.
Last Updated on Sunday, 06 May 2012 23:55