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- THE JEWISH COMMUNITY -

Map of Ukraine [February 2009]

Medieval Ukrainian lands were a loosely knit group of principalities. By the late 1300s, most Ukrainian lands were controlled by either the Grand Duchy of Lithuania or the Mongolian-Tatar Golden Horde. In 1569, the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania became the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Poland controlled Western Ukrainian lands while eastern Ukrainian was controlled by the Ottoman Empire. In 1772, Russia, Prussia, and Austria partitioned the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at which time several Ukrainian areas became part of Galicia, a province of Austria. By 1795, Austria controlled western Ukraine and Russia controlled eastern Ukraine. During the 1930s, all of western Ukraine was governed by either Poland and/or Czechoslovakia. By the end of WWI, Ukrainian territory was divided into the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR), Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Romania. In 1939 the Jewish population of Ukraine was 1.5 million (1,532,776) or 3% of the total population of Ukraine. One half to two thirds of the total Jewish population of Ukraine were evacuated, killed or exiled to Siberia. Ukraine lost more population per capita than any other country in the world in WW II. After WWII, the borders of the Ukrainian SSR expanded west, including those Ukrainian areas of Galicia. At the collapse of the USSR in 1991, Ukraine became an independent state. JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker references border changes of a given town with more information at JewishGen ShtetLinks for Ukrainian towns. [February 2009]

Ukraine SIG facilitates research of former Russian Empire Guberniyas now in Ukraine; Podolia, Volhynia, Kiev, Poltava, Chernigov, Kharkov, Kherson, Taurida and Yekaterinoslav. [February 2009]

HISTORY: Wikipedia article: "History of the Jews of Ukraine" and The Virtual Jewish History Library- Ukraine [February 2009]

US Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad, 1101 Fifteenth Street, Suite 1040, Washington, DC 20005. Telephone 202-254-3824. Executive Director: Joel Barries. US Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad supplied most Ukraine information. The data is alphabetical by the name of the town. The Ukrainian government has ordered an immediate and absolute moratorium on all construction or privatization of sites that have been identified as Jewish cemeteries either now or in the past. A Joint Cultural Heritage Commission to develop and agree on a comprehensive solution to preserve and protect Jewish cemeteries. Over 1000 individual sites have been described, which is estimated to be about one-half of the recoverable sites. Contact Samuel Gruber; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for further information and details about the report of the Commission. [Date?]

Historical Research Center for Western Ukrainian communities in all countries: "ZIKARON"

Ukraine Jewish community.

Jewish Cemeteries in Ukraine Report, Winter 1997-98

Ukraine's turbulent past saw sovereignty pass between Poland, Russia and other nations, but has a rich history: one Crimean tribe converting to Judaism in the eighth century, the first shtetls built by Jews working for Polish aristocrats (18th century), and rise of Hasidism. The Germans murdered 1.4 million of the two million Jews. Communism then suppressed religious life of those that survived. Despite this, Ukraine is now home to one of the largest Jewish communities in Europe (100,000-300,000). Some 1500 Jewish heritage sites published by the United States Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad (2005)

BOOKS ABOUT UKRAINE:

  • Yizkor Books:
  1. Chelm, M. Bakalczuk-Felin, 1954, in Yiddish.
  2. Dnepropetrovsk-Yekaterinoslav, Harkavy and Goldburt, 1973, in Hebrew.
  3. Pinkas Hakehillot Poland, Volumes I-VII.
  • Frank, Ben G. A Travel Guide to Jewish Russia & Ukraine. Paperback (October 1999) Pelican Pub Co; ISBN: 1565543556
  • Gitelman, Zvi. Chapter The Jews of Ukraine and Moldova" published in Miriam Weiner's Jewish Roots in Ukraine
    and Moldova
    (see below) online.
  • Goberman, D. Jewish Tombstones in Ukraine and Moldova. Image Press, 1993. ISBN 5-86044-019-7) shows many interesting styles.
  • Greenberg, M. Graves of Tsadikim Justs in Russia. Jerusalem, 1989. 97 pages, illustrated, Hebrew and English. S2 89A4924. Notes: Rabbis tombstone restoration, no index, arranged by non-alphabetical town names.
  • Gruber, Ruth Ellen. Jewish Heritage Travel: A Guide to Eastern Europe, Washington: National Geographic, 2007
  • Ostrovskaya, Rita (Photographer), Southard, John S. and Eskildsen, Ute (Editor). Jews in the Ukraine: 1989-1994: Shtetls. Distributed Art Publishers; ISBN: 3893228527
  • Weiner, Miriam. Jewish Roots in Ukraine and Moldova: Pages from the Past and Archival Inventories (The Jewish Genealogy Series). Routes to Roots Foundation/YIVO InstituteYIVO Institute; ISBN: 0965650812. see Routes to Roots Foundation, Inc.
  • BELGIUM: Contact Daniel Dratwa This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for books among the collection at the Jewish Museum of Belgium.
  • ISRAEL: Tragger, Mathilde. Printed Books on Jewish cemeteries in the Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem: an annotated bibliography. Jerusalem: The Israel Genealogical Society, 1997.
  • David Chapin, Plano, Texas This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it can answer questions about general structure of tombstones in this country.

BOOKS ABOUT CRIMEA:

  • Chwolson, D. Corpus inscriptionum hebraicarum (All the Hebrew Inscriptions). Hildesheim, 1974 (1st print: St. Petersburg, 1882). 527 pages, Latin title and German text. SB74B2774. Notes: 194 tombstones, 9th-15th centuries, based on Firkowiz's book scripture analysis.
  • Chwolson, D. Achtzehn hebraische Grabschiften aus der Krim (Eighteen Hebrew grave inscriptions in Crimea).. St. Petersburg, 1985 in "Memories de L'Academie Imperial de St. Petersburg", 7Šme, series, volume IX, no. 7, III XVIII, 528 pages, illustrated. [translation] of the author's Russian book s29V5256]. German text and Hebrew inscriptions. PV255, series 7, book 9, no.7. Notes: 18 tombstones, 6-960, scripture analysis based on Firkowiz's book.
  • Firkowiz, A. Y. Avnei zikaron behatsi ha'i krim, besela hayehudim bemangup, besulkat ubekapa (Jewish memorial stones in Crimea and in [the Caucasian towns of Mangup, Sulkat and Kapa [Theodesia). Vilnius, 1872. 256 pages, illustrated, Hebrew. 29V4818. Notes: 564 tombstones, 3-1842.
  • Harkavy, A.L. Alte juedusche Denmaeler aus der krim (The old Jewish monuments in Crimea),. St. Petersburg, 1876, X, 288 pages. German and Hebrew inscriptions. PV255, VII, 24/1. Notes: 261 inscriptions, 604-916?, scripture analysis based on Firkowiz's book.
  • Click the words "Article Title" below to sort the page names alphabetically.

    The names will be sorted from Z to A.  Click a second time to see them listed from A to Z.   Our apologies for the unsorted condition of this list.  We hope to have the list appear in A to Z sort very soon.

    --IAJGS Jewish Cemetery Project Technical Staff.

Title Filter     Display # 
# Burial Location
801 SNITIN , SNITN, SNYATIN: (Hungarian) see Snyatyn
802 SNIATIN , SNIATYN: (German) see Snyatyn
803 SNAMENKA: (Polish) see Znamenka
804 SMILA: (Ukraine) see Smela
805 SMIEDZYBORZ: (Hungarian) see Medzhibozh
806 SMIEDRYBORZ: (Hungarian) see Medzhibozh
807 SMIDOVICHA: (English) see Chkalovo
808 SMELA
809 SLOWITA: (Hungarian) see Slavuta
810 SLOVITA: (German) see Slavuta
811 SLOVECHNO
812 SLOTJINA: (Hebrew) see Solotvina
813 SLOTFINA: (Yiddish) see Solotvina
814 SLISHTCH YADOL: (Hungarian) see Sosnovoye
815 SLISHCH YUDOL: (German) see Sosnovoye
816 SLAVYANSK
817 SLAWUYA: (Yiddish) see Slavuta
818 SLAWUTA: (Yiddish) see Slavuta
819 SLAVUTA [SLOVITA SŁAWUTA, SLAVOUTA: KHMELNYTSKYY obslast
820 SLAVITA: (German) see Slavuta
821 SLAVA
822 SLATINSKE DOLY: (Czech) see Solotvina
823 SLATINA
824 KOBILNYE: See Kobyl'noye
825 SLADKOVODNOYE: see KOBILNYE
826 SKWIRA: (German) see Skvira
827 SKWIRA: (German) see Skvira
828 SKVIRA (SKVYRA): Skvyrskyi Raion, Kyiv Oblast
829 SKVER: (Yiddish) see Skvira
830 SKURATY
831 SKOREZ: (Polish) see Shchirets
832 SKOLE
833 SKOL: (German) see Sokal'
834 SKOBELKA
835 SKHODNITSA
836 SKELIVKA: Lvovskaya Oblast [FELSZTYN , FELSHTIN , SKELIVKA , FULLENSTEIN , FELSTIN, FELSTEEN, FEL'SHTYN, FEL'SHTIN, SKELIWKA]
837 SKALAT: Tarnopil oblast
838 SKALA PODOLSKAYA
839 SKALA NAD ZBRUCHEM: (Russian) see Skala Podolskaya
840 SKALA: (German) see Skala Podolskaya
841 SKAL: (Yiddish) see Skala Podolskaya
842 SISCAUTI: (Hungarian) see Shishkovtsy
843 SIRET: (German, Yiddish) also see Banilov
844 SINOVIR: (German) see Sinevir
845 SINEVIR
846 SIMFEROPOL
847 SIKURAN: (Polish) see Sokyryany
848 SIKERNICA: (Hungarian) see Sokirnitsa
849 SIENKIWICZOWKA: (Hungarian) see v. Senkevichevka and Senkevichevka
850 SHWARTZ STIMME: (German) see Belaya Tserkov
851 SHUMSKOYE: (Yiddish) see Shumsk
852 SHUMSK
853 SHTERNDPRF: (Yiddish) 1927-46 see v. Malaya Seymenukha
854 SHRGOROD: (Yiddish) see Shargorod
855 SHPOLA
856 SHPIKOV
857 SHOMSK: (Hungarian) see Shumsk
858 SHNYATIN , SNETIN: (Yiddish) see Snyatyn
859 SHMERINKA: (Yiddish) see Zhmerinca
860 SHLYOMARKA: see Lubormirka
861 SHKLO
862 SHITOMIR: (English, German, Russian, Slov and Ukraine) see Zhitomir
863 SHISHKOVTSY
864 SHISHKOVTSE: (Yiddish) see Shishkovtsy
865 SHIMSK: (German) see Shumsk
866 SHEPETOVKA [SHEPETIVKA , SZEPETÓWKA , SCHEPETOWKA ,SHCHEPETOVKA, SCHEPETIWKA, SZEPIETOWKA, SEPITIVKA, SHEPETIFKE, Sudilkova] : Khmelnytskyi Oblast
867 SHEPETIVKA: (Ukraine Yiddish) see Shepetovka
868 SHEPEL
869 SHCHORS
870 SHCHERBASHINTSI
871 SHCHIRETS
872 SHATSK
873 SHAROGROD: (Ukraine) see Shargorod
874 SHARIGROD: (Russian and Ukraine) see Shargorod
875 SHARIGRAD: (Polish and Russian) see Shargorod
876 SHARGOROD [Sharhorod, Sharigro, Sarhorod] Vinnytsya oblast
877 SHARGOROD CEMETERY: see Podolia Guberniya
878 SHAPOVALOVKA (BORZNA)
879 SHANDROV: (Hungarian) see Aleksandrovka
880 SHANDREF: see Alexandrovka
881 SGORANI
882 SEYMENUKHA: (Hebrew) see Malaya Seymenukha
883 SEYDEMENUKHA: (Hebrew) see Kalininskoye
884 SEWLUSZ: (Yiddish) see Vinogradov
885 SEVLJUS: (Hebrew and others) see Vinogradov
886 SEVLIUSH: (Hebrew and Russian) see Vinogradov
887 SEVERINOVKA
888 SEREDNYA
889 SEPETIVKA: (Ukraine) see Shepetovka
890 SENKEVICHOVKA: (German) see v. Senkevichevka
891 SENKEVICHEVKA
892 SENKEVICEVKA: (Yiddish) see v. Senkevichevka
893 SEMONOVKA: (Yiddish) See SEMENIVKA: Poltavska or SEMENIVKA: Chernihiv
894 SEMENOVKA: See SEMENIVKA: Poltavska or SEMENIVKA: Chernihiv
895 SELISH: (Ukraine) see Vinogradov SELO
896 SELETS
897 SEKURIAN: (Slov) see Sokyryany
898 SEKURENI TARG: (Hungarian) see Sokyryany
899 SOKYRYANY: Secureni Târg, Sekiryany, Sekuren', Sekureni, Sekuryany in Chernivets'ka Oblast'
900 SEKERNICE: (German) see Sokirnitsa
 
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