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- THE JEWISH COMMUNITY -

Map of Ukraine [February 2009]

Medieval Ukrainian lands were a loosely knit group of principalities. By the late 1300s, most Ukrainian lands were controlled by either the Grand Duchy of Lithuania or the Mongolian-Tatar Golden Horde. In 1569, the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania became the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Poland controlled Western Ukrainian lands while eastern Ukrainian was controlled by the Ottoman Empire. In 1772, Russia, Prussia, and Austria partitioned the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at which time several Ukrainian areas became part of Galicia, a province of Austria. By 1795, Austria controlled western Ukraine and Russia controlled eastern Ukraine. During the 1930s, all of western Ukraine was governed by either Poland and/or Czechoslovakia. By the end of WWI, Ukrainian territory was divided into the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR), Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Romania. In 1939 the Jewish population of Ukraine was 1.5 million (1,532,776) or 3% of the total population of Ukraine. One half to two thirds of the total Jewish population of Ukraine were evacuated, killed or exiled to Siberia. Ukraine lost more population per capita than any other country in the world in WW II. After WWII, the borders of the Ukrainian SSR expanded west, including those Ukrainian areas of Galicia. At the collapse of the USSR in 1991, Ukraine became an independent state. JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker references border changes of a given town with more information at JewishGen ShtetLinks for Ukrainian towns. [February 2009]

Ukraine SIG facilitates research of former Russian Empire Guberniyas now in Ukraine; Podolia, Volhynia, Kiev, Poltava, Chernigov, Kharkov, Kherson, Taurida and Yekaterinoslav. [February 2009]

HISTORY: Wikipedia article: "History of the Jews of Ukraine" and The Virtual Jewish History Library- Ukraine [February 2009]

US Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad, 1101 Fifteenth Street, Suite 1040, Washington, DC 20005. Telephone 202-254-3824. Executive Director: Joel Barries. US Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad supplied most Ukraine information. The data is alphabetical by the name of the town. The Ukrainian government has ordered an immediate and absolute moratorium on all construction or privatization of sites that have been identified as Jewish cemeteries either now or in the past. A Joint Cultural Heritage Commission to develop and agree on a comprehensive solution to preserve and protect Jewish cemeteries. Over 1000 individual sites have been described, which is estimated to be about one-half of the recoverable sites. Contact Samuel Gruber; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for further information and details about the report of the Commission. [Date?]

Historical Research Center for Western Ukrainian communities in all countries: "ZIKARON"

Ukraine Jewish community.

Jewish Cemeteries in Ukraine Report, Winter 1997-98

Ukraine's turbulent past saw sovereignty pass between Poland, Russia and other nations, but has a rich history: one Crimean tribe converting to Judaism in the eighth century, the first shtetls built by Jews working for Polish aristocrats (18th century), and rise of Hasidism. The Germans murdered 1.4 million of the two million Jews. Communism then suppressed religious life of those that survived. Despite this, Ukraine is now home to one of the largest Jewish communities in Europe (100,000-300,000). Some 1500 Jewish heritage sites published by the United States Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad (2005)

BOOKS ABOUT UKRAINE:

  • Yizkor Books:
  1. Chelm, M. Bakalczuk-Felin, 1954, in Yiddish.
  2. Dnepropetrovsk-Yekaterinoslav, Harkavy and Goldburt, 1973, in Hebrew.
  3. Pinkas Hakehillot Poland, Volumes I-VII.
  • Frank, Ben G. A Travel Guide to Jewish Russia & Ukraine. Paperback (October 1999) Pelican Pub Co; ISBN: 1565543556
  • Gitelman, Zvi. Chapter The Jews of Ukraine and Moldova" published in Miriam Weiner's Jewish Roots in Ukraine
    and Moldova
    (see below) online.
  • Goberman, D. Jewish Tombstones in Ukraine and Moldova. Image Press, 1993. ISBN 5-86044-019-7) shows many interesting styles.
  • Greenberg, M. Graves of Tsadikim Justs in Russia. Jerusalem, 1989. 97 pages, illustrated, Hebrew and English. S2 89A4924. Notes: Rabbis tombstone restoration, no index, arranged by non-alphabetical town names.
  • Gruber, Ruth Ellen. Jewish Heritage Travel: A Guide to Eastern Europe, Washington: National Geographic, 2007
  • Ostrovskaya, Rita (Photographer), Southard, John S. and Eskildsen, Ute (Editor). Jews in the Ukraine: 1989-1994: Shtetls. Distributed Art Publishers; ISBN: 3893228527
  • Weiner, Miriam. Jewish Roots in Ukraine and Moldova: Pages from the Past and Archival Inventories (The Jewish Genealogy Series). Routes to Roots Foundation/YIVO InstituteYIVO Institute; ISBN: 0965650812. see Routes to Roots Foundation, Inc.
  • BELGIUM: Contact Daniel Dratwa This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for books among the collection at the Jewish Museum of Belgium.
  • ISRAEL: Tragger, Mathilde. Printed Books on Jewish cemeteries in the Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem: an annotated bibliography. Jerusalem: The Israel Genealogical Society, 1997.
  • David Chapin, Plano, Texas This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it can answer questions about general structure of tombstones in this country.

BOOKS ABOUT CRIMEA:

  • Chwolson, D. Corpus inscriptionum hebraicarum (All the Hebrew Inscriptions). Hildesheim, 1974 (1st print: St. Petersburg, 1882). 527 pages, Latin title and German text. SB74B2774. Notes: 194 tombstones, 9th-15th centuries, based on Firkowiz's book scripture analysis.
  • Chwolson, D. Achtzehn hebraische Grabschiften aus der Krim (Eighteen Hebrew grave inscriptions in Crimea).. St. Petersburg, 1985 in "Memories de L'Academie Imperial de St. Petersburg", 7Šme, series, volume IX, no. 7, III XVIII, 528 pages, illustrated. [translation] of the author's Russian book s29V5256]. German text and Hebrew inscriptions. PV255, series 7, book 9, no.7. Notes: 18 tombstones, 6-960, scripture analysis based on Firkowiz's book.
  • Firkowiz, A. Y. Avnei zikaron behatsi ha'i krim, besela hayehudim bemangup, besulkat ubekapa (Jewish memorial stones in Crimea and in [the Caucasian towns of Mangup, Sulkat and Kapa [Theodesia). Vilnius, 1872. 256 pages, illustrated, Hebrew. 29V4818. Notes: 564 tombstones, 3-1842.
  • Harkavy, A.L. Alte juedusche Denmaeler aus der krim (The old Jewish monuments in Crimea),. St. Petersburg, 1876, X, 288 pages. German and Hebrew inscriptions. PV255, VII, 24/1. Notes: 261 inscriptions, 604-916?, scripture analysis based on Firkowiz's book.
  • Click the words "Burial Location" below to sort the page names alphabetically.

    The names will be sorted from Z to A.  Click a second time to see them listed from A to Z.   Our apologies for the unsorted condition of this list.  We hope to have the list appear in A to Z sort very soon.

    --IAJGS Jewish Cemetery Project Technical Staff.

Title Filter     Display # 
# Burial Location
601 TURIJSK: (Russian) see Turiysk
602 TURCHIN: (Yiddish) see Tulchin
603 TURIA BISTA
604 TUPICHEV
605 TULTCHIN: (German and Polish) see Tulchin
606 TULIGOLOVO
607 TULCZYN: (Hebrew) see Tulchin
608 TULCIN: (Yiddish and Russian) see Tulchin
609 TULCHIN [TUL'CHYN , TULTCHIN TULCIN , TULCZYN , , TULCIÎN, TULTSCHIN, TULTSCHYN, TOULTCHYN, TUŁČYN: Vinnitskaya oblast
610 TULCZYN I: (Polish) see Tulchin
611 TUCHIN
612 TSVETKOVO: (Russian) see Zhovtnevoye
613 TSMINY
614 TSHARTORISK: (English) see Stariy Chartoriysk
615 TSCHETSCHELNIK: (German) see Chechelnik
616 TSCHERNIGOV: (Yiddish and Hungarian) see Chernigov
617 TSCHERIGOV: (Yiddish) see Chernigov
618 TRUVITZ: (Yiddish) see Torgavitsa and v. Torgovitsa
619 TRUSK: (Hungarian) see Turiysk
620 TRUDOVIK
621 TROYANOVKA
622 TROSTYANYETS: see TROSTIANETS and BEREZHANY
623 TROSTIANETS: Trostyanyets, Troscianiec : Sumy Oblast
624 TROSCIANIEC: see TROSTYANETS and BEREZHANY
625 TORCZYN: (Russian and Yiddish) see Torchin
626 TORCHIN
627 TOPOROW: (Polish) see Toporov
628 TOPOROV
629 TOMASHPIL: [TOMASHPOL, TOMASZPOL , TOMASHPOLYE] : Vinnytsia region
630 TOLSTOYE
631 TOLNA: see Talnoye
632 TOKVAK
633 TOKMAK
634 TLUSTE: (German) see Tolstoye
635 TLUSTE WIES: (Slov) see Tolstoye
636 TLUSTE MIASTO: (Hungarian) see Tolstoye
637 TLUSTA: (Yiddish) see Tolstoye
638 TLUMATCH: (Czech) see Tlumach
639 TLUMACZ: (Hungarian) see Tlumach
640 TLUMACH: [Tovmach, Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast. TŁUMACZ, TOLMITSH, TALMATCH, TLOMATS, TLUMATCH, TOVMACH
641 TLOMATS, TLUMACZ: (Hungarian) see Tlumach
642 TISZA UJLAK: (Yiddish) see Vilok
643 TISOBEKESH: (Hungarian) see v. Bobovo
644 TISMIENICA: (German) see Tysmenitsa
645 TISMENITZ: (Yiddish) see Tysmenitsa
646 TISAYGEN: (Hungarian) see v. novoye Selo
647 TISOBEKESH: (Hungarian) see Bobovo
648 TISMENITZ: see Tysmenica
649 TIMNOVICHI
650 TIACHEVO: (Russian) see Tyachev
651 TIACHEVA, TESCO: (Yiddish) see Tyachev
652 TIACHEV: (Ukraine) see Tyachev
653 TETYIOW: (Polish) see Tetiyev
654 TETIYEV (TETIIV): Tetiivskyi Raion
655 TETIEV: (German) see Tetiyev
656 TERNOVAYA BALKA
657 TERNOPIL': [Ternopil, Tarnopol, Ternopol'] Ternopil Oblast
658 TEREBOVLYA: Ternopil oblast [Теребовля, Trembowla] Trembovla, Trebevle, Terebowlja, Terebovlia,]
659 TEREBLE: (Yiddish) see Terebovlya
660 TEPLIK
661 TEKEHAZA
662 TECH: (Hungarian) see Tyachev
663 TATARBUNARY
664 TATAR BUNAR: (Russian) see Tatarbunary
665 TARUTINO
666 TARUJ FALU: (others) see Novoselice
667 TARNOPOL: (Russian) see Ternopol
668 TARGOWICA: (English) see Torgavitsa, (Russian) see v. Torgovitsa
669 TARGOVITZA: (English, Polish) see v. Torgovitsa & Torgavitsa
670 TARGOVITSE: (Hungarian) see Torgavitsa and v. Torgovitsa
671 TARGOVITSA: (German) see Torgavitsa and v. Ttorgovitsa
672 TARASZCZA: (Polish) see Tarashcha
673 TARASZA: (Polish) see Tarashcha
674 TARASOVKA ( Boyarka and Tarasovka)
675 TARASHTCHA: (German) see Tarashcha
676 TARASHCHA
677 TARASHA
678 TARAKANOV
679 TARACUJFALU: (Hebrew) see Novoselice
680 TALNOYE
681 TALMACH, TALMATCH: (German) see Tlumach
682 TACOVO: (Czech) see Tyachev
683 TACHOVO, TIACZOVO: (Polish) see Tyachev
684 TACHOVO, TETSH: (German) see Tyachev
685 SZYSZKOWCE: (Slov) see Shishkovtsy
686 SZUMSK: (Czech) see Shumsk
687 SZORTKOW: (German) see Chortkiv
688 SZOLLOS: (Hungarian) see Vinogradov
689 SZOLLOS: (Hungarian) see Vinogradov
690 SZLATINA , SLOTVINA: (Polish) see Solotvina
691 SZLATINA: (German and others) see Solotvina
692 SZEPETOWKA: (German) see Shepetovka
693 SZEPETOVKA: (Polish) see Shepetovka
694 SZEKIENCZE: (Polish) see Sokirnitsa
695 SZCZPAN: (Czech) see Stepan
696 SZARGOROD: (Polish and Ukraine) see Shargorod
697 SWIRZ: (German and Polish) see Svirzh-I and II
698 SVITYAZ
699 SVIRZH
700 SVETLOVODSK
 
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