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- THE JEWISH COMMUNITY -

Map of Ukraine [February 2009]

Medieval Ukrainian lands were a loosely knit group of principalities. By the late 1300s, most Ukrainian lands were controlled by either the Grand Duchy of Lithuania or the Mongolian-Tatar Golden Horde. In 1569, the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania became the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Poland controlled Western Ukrainian lands while eastern Ukrainian was controlled by the Ottoman Empire. In 1772, Russia, Prussia, and Austria partitioned the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at which time several Ukrainian areas became part of Galicia, a province of Austria. By 1795, Austria controlled western Ukraine and Russia controlled eastern Ukraine. During the 1930s, all of western Ukraine was governed by either Poland and/or Czechoslovakia. By the end of WWI, Ukrainian territory was divided into the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR), Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Romania. In 1939 the Jewish population of Ukraine was 1.5 million (1,532,776) or 3% of the total population of Ukraine. One half to two thirds of the total Jewish population of Ukraine were evacuated, killed or exiled to Siberia. Ukraine lost more population per capita than any other country in the world in WW II. After WWII, the borders of the Ukrainian SSR expanded west, including those Ukrainian areas of Galicia. At the collapse of the USSR in 1991, Ukraine became an independent state. JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker references border changes of a given town with more information at JewishGen ShtetLinks for Ukrainian towns. [February 2009]

Ukraine SIG facilitates research of former Russian Empire Guberniyas now in Ukraine; Podolia, Volhynia, Kiev, Poltava, Chernigov, Kharkov, Kherson, Taurida and Yekaterinoslav. [February 2009]

Wikipedia article: "History of the Jews of Ukraine" and The Virtual Jewish History Library- Ukraine [February 2009]

DONOR OF REPORTS: US Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad, 1101 Fifteenth Street, Suite 1040, Washington, DC 20005. Telephone 202-254-3824. Executive Director: Joel Barries. US Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad supplied most Ukraine information. The data is alphabetical by the name of the town. The Ukrainian government has ordered an immediate and absolute moratorium on all construction or privatization of sites that have been identified as Jewish cemeteries either now or in the past. A Joint Cultural Heritage Commission to develop and agree on a comprehensive solution to preserve and protect Jewish cemeteries. Over 1000 individual sites have been described, which is estimated to be about one-half of the recoverable sites. Contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for further information and details about the report of the Commission. [Date?]

Historical Research Center for Western Ukrainian communities in all countries: "ZIKARON"

Ukraine Jewish community.

Jewish Cemeteries in Ukraine Report, Winter 1997-98

Ukraine's sovereignty passed between Poland, Russia and other nations. One Crimean tribe converted to Judaism in the eighth century. The first shtetls were built by Jews working for Polish aristocrats (18th century),  The Germans murderedSome 1500 Jewish heritage sites published by the United States Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad (2005)

Western Ukraine, Only a small remnant of its former Jewish population remains with L'viv and Chernivtsi each with about 6,000 Jews.  The majority of Jews in present-day Ukraine are native Russian/Ukrainian speakers, and only some of the elderly speak Yiddish as their mother tongue (in 1926, 76.1% claimed Yiddish as their mother tongue). The average age is close to 45. To find where records can be found, right click Archives Database, then Search Database. Activate Soundex and type in your ancestral town names.

Jewish Agricultural Colonies in the Ukraine: Chaim Freedman links to other interesting sites

Ukrainian Language, Culture and Travel with  photos of synagogues and memorials along with articles about Jewish culture 

BOOKS ABOUT UKRAINE:

  • Yizkor Books:
  1. Chelm, M. Bakalczuk-Felin, 1954, in Yiddish.
  2. Dnepropetrovsk-Yekaterinoslav, Harkavy and Goldburt, 1973, in Hebrew.
  3. Pinkas Hakehillot Poland, Volumes I-VII.
  • Frank, Ben G. A Travel Guide to Jewish Russia & Ukraine. Paperback (October 1999) Pelican Pub Co; ISBN: 1565543556
  • Gitelman, Zvi. Chapter The Jews of Ukraine and Moldova" published in Miriam Weiner's Jewish Roots in Ukraine
    and Moldova
    (see below) online.
  • Goberman, D. Jewish Tombstones in Ukraine and Moldova. Image Press, 1993. ISBN 5-86044-019-7) shows many interesting styles.
  • Greenberg, M. Graves of Tsadikim Justs in Russia. Jerusalem, 1989. 97 pages, illustrated, Hebrew and English. S2 89A4924. Notes: Rabbis tombstone restoration, no index, arranged by non-alphabetical town names.
  • Gruber, Ruth Ellen. Jewish Heritage Travel: A Guide to Eastern Europe, Washington: National Geographic, 2007
  • Ostrovskaya, Rita (Photographer), Southard, John S. and Eskildsen, Ute (Editor). Jews in the Ukraine: 1989-1994: Shtetls. Distributed Art Publishers; ISBN: 3893228527
  • Weiner, Miriam. Jewish Roots in Ukraine and Moldova: Pages from the Past and Archival Inventories (The Jewish Genealogy Series). Routes to Roots Foundation/YIVO InstituteYIVO Institute; ISBN: 0965650812. see Routes to Roots Foundation, Inc.
  • BELGIUM: Contact Daniel Dratwa This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for books among the collection at the Jewish Museum of Belgium.
  • ISRAEL: Tragger, Mathilde. Printed Books on Jewish cemeteries in the Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem: an annotated bibliography. Jerusalem: The Israel Genealogical Society, 1997.
  • David Chapin, Plano, Texas This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it can answer questions about general structure of tombstones in this country.

BOOKS ABOUT CRIMEA:

  • Chwolson, D. Corpus inscriptionum hebraicarum (All the Hebrew Inscriptions). Hildesheim, 1974 (1st print: St. Petersburg, 1882). 527 pages, Latin title and German text. SB74B2774. Notes: 194 tombstones, 9th-15th centuries, based on Firkowiz's book scripture analysis.
  • Chwolson, D. Achtzehn hebraische Grabschiften aus der Krim (Eighteen Hebrew grave inscriptions in Crimea).. St. Petersburg, 1985 in "Memories de L'Academie Imperial de St. Petersburg", 7Šme, series, volume IX, no. 7, III XVIII, 528 pages, illustrated. [translation] of the author's Russian book s29V5256]. German text and Hebrew inscriptions. PV255, series 7, book 9, no.7. Notes: 18 tombstones, 6-960, scripture analysis based on Firkowiz's book.
  • Firkowiz, A. Y. Avnei zikaron behatsi ha'i krim, besela hayehudim bemangup, besulkat ubekapa (Jewish memorial stones in Crimea and in [the Caucasian towns of Mangup, Sulkat and Kapa [Theodesia). Vilnius, 1872. 256 pages, illustrated, Hebrew. 29V4818. Notes: 564 tombstones, 3-1842.
  • Harkavy, A.L. Alte juedusche Denmaeler aus der krim (The old Jewish monuments in Crimea),. St. Petersburg, 1876, X, 288 pages. German and Hebrew inscriptions. PV255, VII, 24/1. Notes: 261 inscriptions, 604-916?, scripture analysis based on Firkowiz's book.
  • Click the words "Burial Location" below to sort the page names alphabetically.

    The names will be sorted from Z to A.  Click a second time to see them listed from A to Z.   Our apologies for the unsorted condition of this list.  We hope to have the list appear in A to Z sort very soon.

    --IAJGS Jewish Cemetery Project Technical Staff.

Title Filter     Display # 
# Burial Location
1901 MIKOLINTZA: (Yiddish) see Mikulintsy
1902 MIKOLINCE: (German) see Mikulintsy
1903 MIKOLAJOW: (Polish) see Nikolaev
1904 MIKOLAJOW: (Polish) see Mykolaiv
1905 MIKOLAIV: (German) see Mykolaiv
1906 MIKITIN RIG , SLAV'YANSK: (Ukraine) see Nikopol
1907 MIKHAYLOVKA
1908 MIKHALPOL: (German and Ukriane) see Mihhaylovka; also see Podolia Guberniya
1909 MIKHAILOVKA
1910 MIKHAILOVKA: (Russian) see Mikhaylovka
1911 MIKALAYVKA: (Ukraine) see Nikolaevka
1912 MIHHAYLOVKA
1913 MIHALCHINA SLOBODA
1914 MIELNICA: (Czech) see Melnitsa Podolskaya
1915 MIEDZYBOZ: (Russian) see Medzhibozh
1916 MIECZYSZCZOW: see BEREZHANY and MECHYSHCHIV
1917 MICHELYOLIA: (Hungarian) see Mikhaylovka
1918 MICHELPOLIA: (Hungarian) see Mihhaylovka
1919 MICHAYLOVKA: (German and Ukraine) see Mikhaylovka
1920 MICHAYLOVE: (Slov) see Piryatin
1921 MICHALPOL: (Russian and Yiddish) see Mihhaylovka
1922 MGSZKOW: (German) see Kozelets
1923 MEZOKASZONY: see KOSINY
1924 MEZLRICH: (Hungarian) see Velikiye Mezhirichi
1925 MEZIROV: (Polish) see v. Mezhirov and Mezhirov
1926 MEZHIROV [MEZIROV, MEZHYROV, MEŻYRÓW, MESHEROV , MEZHYRIV ] Vinnytsya oblast
1927 MEZHIRICHKA: (Yiddish) see Emilchino
1928 MEZHIRECHYE: (Yiddish) see Chudin (Mezhirechye)
1929 MEZHGORYE
1930 MEZHGIR'YE: (Ukraine) see Mezhgorye
1931 MEZHDU BUZH'YE: (Ukraine) see Medzhibozh
1932 MEZGORJE: (German) see Mezhgorye
1933 MESHEROV: (German and Yiddish) see v. Mezhirov
1934 MESCHIGORIE: (Yiddish) see Mezhgorye
1935 MENZYCZY: (German) see Velikiye Mezhirichi
1936 MENZHIRICHI: (Yiddish) see Velikiye Mezhirichi
1937 MENZHICHI: (Yiddish) see Velikiye Mezhirichi
1938 MEZDU BUT'YE: (Ukraine) see Medzhibozh
1939 MELNITZA: (Hungarian) see Melnitsa Podolskaya
1940 MELNITSE: (German) see Melnitsa Podolskaya
1941 MELNITSA PODOLSKAYA
1942 MELNITSA PODILSKA: (Ukraine) see Melnitsa Podolskaya
1943 MELNITSA NADS DNESTROM: (Russian) see Melnitsa Podolskaya
1944 MELNITSA: (Yiddish) see Melnitsa Podolskaya and v. Melnitsa
1945 MELNITSA PODILSKA: (Ukraine) see Melnitsa Podolskaya
1946 MELNITSA NADS DNESTROM: (Russian) see Melnitsa Podolskaya
1947 MELNITSA
1948 MELNICE: (Slov) see Melnitsa Podolskaya
1949 MELITOPOL: Zaporizhia Oblast[
1950 MELENY
1951 MEJUROV
1952 MEDZIBOZH: (German) see Medzhibozh
1953 MEDZHIBOZH
1954 MEDZHIBEZH: (Yiddish) see Medzhibozh
1955 MEDVIN: Bohuslavskyi Raion, Kyiv Oblast
1956 MECHYSHCHIV
1957 MAYDAN
1958 MATUYKOV
1959 MATKOW
1960 MATKIV: (Ukraine) see Matkow
1961 MATIYKOV
1962 MAT'FOLVO: (Hungarian) see Matkow
1963 MASHKEV: (Yiddish) see Kozelets
1964 MARYINBUG: (Russian) see Maryevka
1965 MARYEVKA
1966 MARYANOVKA
1967 MARKHLEVSK: (Ukraine) see Dovbysh
1968 MARNIVKA
1969 MARINOVKA
1970 MARININ USTYE
1971 MARHLEVSK: (Russian) see Dovbysh
1972 MARCOVO
1973 MARCOVE: (Ukraine) see Marcovo
1974 MAR'YEVKA: (Ukraine) see Maryevka
1975 MAR'EVKA
1976 MANYEVISH: (Czech) see Manevichy
1977 MANYEVICHI: (Slov) see Manevichy
1978 MANYEVICH: (Czech) see v. Manyevichi and Manevichy
1979 MANIVTSY
1980 MAPVITS: (Hungarian) see v. Muravitsa
1981 MANEVICHY/MANYEVICHI
1982 MANIVTSI: (Ukraine) see v. Manivtsy and Manivtsy
1983 MANIVITS: (Hungarian) see Manevichy and v. Manyevichi
1984 MANIEWICZE: (German) see Manevichy and v. Manyevichi
1985 MANIEVICH: (Yiddish) see Manevichy and v. Manyevichi
1986 MANEVICHY-LYUBETOV: (Ukraine) see Manevichy
1987 MANAVITS: (Russian) see MANYEVICHI.
1988 MALIYE MOSHKEVTSY
1989 MALIN
1990 MALAYA SEYMENUKHA
1991 MALAYA GLUSHA
1992 MALAYA DIVITS
1993 MALAYA BARANOVKA: (1793-18 (Ukranish) see IVANOVKA.
1994 MAKEEVKA
1995 MAKAROV: Makarivskyi Raion, Kyiv Oblast [Makariv]
1996 MAJDAN
1997 MADWORNA: (German) see Nadvornaya
1998 GUTA POLONETSKA
1999 GUTA: see Guta Polonetska
2000 GUTA MARYANOVKA: see Maryanovka
 
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