You are here: Home Eastern Europe Ukraine GOLOVANEVSK
GOLOVANEVSK PDF Print E-mail
GOLOVANEVSK I:     US Commission No. UA10060101
Alternate name: Holovanevsk (German) and Golovanevsk (English). The cemetery is located at eastern outskirts of the village. Updated information about the town is in the next section below.
  • Chairman of Jewish Community, Elbert Leonid Solomonovich of Kirovograd, 50 let Oktyabra Street, N25, apt. 33 [Phone: (0522) 232283].
  • The main architect of the region is Chernenko Tamara Antonovna [Phone: (05252) 21270].
     The earliest known Jewish community was 19th century. 1897 Jewish population was 4320. In 1791, Podolskaya Guberniya entered the Jewish Pale. In 1905 were pogroms. The last known Hasidic Jewish burial was 1990. The unlandmarked isolated flat suburban land has no sign or marker. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all. A continuous fence and a gate that does not lock surround the cemetery. The approximate size of cemetery before WWII was 1.50 and is now 1.00 hectares. Location of any removed stones is unknown. The cemetery has special section for graves from 1945. 101 to 500 stones, most in their original location, date from 19th to 20th century. Some tombstones have traces of painting on their surfaces, iron decorations or lettering and/or metal fences around graves. The cemetery contains no known mass graves and no structures. The municipality owns the property used for Jewish cemetery only. Adjacent properties are commercial or industrial. The cemetery boundaries are smaller now than 1939 because of commercial or industrial development. Private visitors and local residents visit occasionally. The cemetery was vandalized during World War II and not in the last 10 years. There has been Local/municipal authorities and Jewish individuals within country cleaned stones, cleared vegetation and fixed wall 1970-1996. Now, individuals occasionally clean or clear site. Serious threat: vandalism (too many destroyed monuments) and existing nearby development (The industrial buildings are too near of the cemetery.). Moderate threat: uncontrolled access, vegetation (Vegetation overgrowth and water drainage are seasonal problems.) and proposed nearby development. Slight threat: weather erosion and pollution.
     Khodorkovskiy Yuriy Isaakovich of Kiev, Vozdukhoflotskiy Street, N37-A, Apt. 23 [Phone: (044) 2769505] visited site on 71/11/996. He finished survey on 14/11/1996. Interviewed was Chernenko T.A. [Phone: (05252) 21270] on 07/11/1996. Documentation: AThe History of the Towns and Villages of Ukraine Kirovogradskaya Oblast. Kiev, 1972; AThe History of the Towns and Villages of Ukraine Kirovogradskaya Oblast; AThe History of the Towns and Villages of Ukraine Kirovogradskaya Oblast; Bagaliy D.I. The Population of South Ukraine; Kharkov, 1920; The plan of the village.
GOLOVANEVSK II:     US Commission No. UA.10060502.
Alternative names: German: Holavanevsk; Russian: Golovanevsk is in Kirovogradskaya Oblast at 48º23' and 30º28', 50 km from Uman and 180 km from Kirovograd. Present town population is 5000-25000. The mass gravesite is located in the central village park, near the Saving-Bank ª2977.The present Jewish population is less than 10.
  • Town officials: Chairman of the village soviet Executive Committee is Sakal Anatoliy Alexeevich, Golovanevsk, Lenin St., 95, tel.: (05252) 2-15-54, 2-15-45.
  • Regional officials: Chairman of Regional State Administration is Cheberyak Vasiliy Romanovich, Golovanevsk, Lenin St., 95, tel.: (05252) 2-11-32. Chairman of district state administration is Gromovoi Mikhail Filippovich, Kirovograd, Kirova square, tel.: (0522) 24-03-30, 24-13-25.
  • Chairman of Jewish Community is Elbert Leonid Solomonovich, Kirovograd, 50-let Oktyabrya St., 25, fl.33, tel.: (0522) 23-22-83.
  • Director of Regional Historical Museum is Derkach M.P., tel.: (05252) 2-12-30; chief architect of the region is Chernenko Tamara Antonovna, tel.: (05252) 2-12-70.

     The mass gravesite memorial is open without caretaker. The earliest mention about Jewish Community is the beginning of the 19th century. 1939 Jewish population (census) was 3,474. In 1791, Podol guberniya entered the "Jewish Pale"; 1905, 1918 were Jewish struggles [sic]; and 1941-1943-Holocaust. The gravesite created in 1950s. The last known Orthodox Jewish burial was in 1950s. The unlandmarked urban plain, part of a municipal cemetery, has sign in Ukrainian "To fascism victims telling about Holocaust. Reached by turning directly off the road, access is open to all. There is no wall, gate, or fence. Current size is 6 square meters. 1-20 brick and stucco with inscriptions in Ukrainian gravestones are all in original locations with no broken or overturned stones. Some separate graves are dedicated to Holocaust victims. There are marked mass graves on the site. Municipality owns property used as a non-sectarian cemetery with mainly Jewish graves. The site borders recreational area (park of village center). Site is visited occasionally by organized groups, private visitors and local citizens. The site never was vandalized. Local municipal authorities erected stones, stones cleaned, and cleared vegetation in 1950s. Now, authorities sometimes clean the site. No caretaker. No structures. Moderate threat: vandalism. Slight threat: safety, erosion and vegetation overgrowth.
     Uriy Isaakovich Khodorkovskiy, Kiev, Vozdukhoflotskiy Prospect, 37A, fl.23, tel.: (044) 276- 95-05 completed the survey 26 February 1997. Documentation: History of towns and villages of Ukrainian RSR Kirovogradskaya region. Kiev, 1972; Encyclopaedia Judaica; Kirovogradtschina during the World War II, 1941-1945. Collection of documents and materials. Dnepropetrovsk, 1965. He visited the site on 7 November 1996 and interviewed director of regional historical-country Museum Derkhach M.P., Golovanevsk, Pionerskaya St., 19, tel.: (05252).

GOLOVANEVSK III:     US Commission No. UA.10060501.
     The unlandmarked mass gravesite is located at northern part of the village near forest "Volovik". The isolated forested plain without sign or marker may be reached by turning directly off the road. Access is open to all with no wall, gate, or fence. Current size is 6 square meters. There are no visible tombstones. Vegetation overgrowth is a seasonal problem. Drainage is a seasonal problem. There are unmarked mass graves in the site. The municipality owns and uses site only as Jewish cemetery. The site borders a forest. The gravesite is visited rarely by local citizens. The site never was vandalized since its creation. No care. No caretaker. No structures.
     Uriy Isaakovich Khodorkovskiy, Kiev, Vozdukhoflotskiy Prospect, 37A, fl.23, tel.: (044) 276- 95-05 completed the survey 26 February 1997. Documentation: History of towns and villages of Ukrainian RSR Kirovogradskaya region. Kiev, 1972; Encyclopaedia Judaica; Kirovogradtschina during the World War II, 1941-1945. Collection of documents and materials. Dnepropetrovsk, 1965. He visited the site on 7 November 1996 and interviewed director of regional historical-country Museum Derkhach M.P., Golovanevsk, Pionerskaya St., 19, tel.: (05252).

Last Updated on Wednesday, 22 July 2009 14:17
 
Web site created by Open Sky Web Design based on a template by Red Evolution