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Alternate names: Haisyn-Гайсин [Ukr], Gaysin-Гайсин [Rus], Haysin [Yid], Hajsyn [Pol], Hajsin, Gaissin, Gaisin, Gajsin. 48°48' N, 29°24' E, 51 miles SE of Vinnytsya (Vinnitsa). 1900 Jewish population: 4,321. Jewish community information. [September 2009]

Jewish Community of Gaisin
I. Franko str. 57-3
Gaisin, Ukraine 23700
Tel.: (380 4334) 2-92-65

GAYSIN:     US Commission No. UA01100101
Gaysin is located in Vinnitskaya at 29º23 48º48, 100 km from Vinnitsa and 62 km from Uman. The cemetery is located on the road out of town. Present town population is 25,001-100,000 with 101-1,000 Jews.

  • Town officials: Town Executive Council of Zamkov Ivan Safronovich [Phone: (043348) 1205].
  • Jewish Community-Molamyd Mikola Nikolaevich [Phone: (043348) 3838].
  • Others: Jewish Oblast Archives of Vinnitsi.
The earliest known Jewish community was 18th century. 1939 Jewish population (census) was 5190. Effected Jewish Community: 1648 pogrom, 1748-1750 pogrom, 1919 pogrom, and 1941 when 6000 Jews were buried in a mass grave in September, October, November and 1942 with about 4000 Bessarabian and Polish Jews killed in concentration camp. Living here was Lesotorhovech Schpilburg. The unlandmarked Jewish cemetery was established in 18th century with last known Hasidic Jewish burial in 1994. The isolated flat suburban land has no sign or marker. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all. A broken fence with gate that does not lock surrounds site. More than 5000 stones, most in original location with less than 25% toppled or broken, date from the 18th century. Location of any removed stones is unknown. The cemetery has no special sections or known mass graves. Some tombstones have portraits and/or metal fences around graves. Local Jewish Community and the municipality own property used for Jewish cemetery only. Adjacent properties are agricultural. The cemetery boundaries are unchanged since 1939. Local residents visit occasionally. The cemetery was vandalized during World War II and occasionally in the last 10 years. Local Jewish resident patched broken stones, cleared vegetation and fixed gate. Now, individuals occasionally clean or clear site. Within the limits of the cemetery are no structures. Vegetation overgrowth is a seasonal problem, preventing access. Water drainage is a seasonal problem. Moderate threat: uncontrolled access. Slight threat: pollution, vegetation and vandalism.
Fuks Mikhail Lvovich of Vinnitsa, Volodarskogo 13, Apt.4 [Phone: 358296] visited site on 7/11/94. No interviews were conducted for this survey. He completed survey in 1994. Documentation: Population of towns in the Podol Region. A. Krylov; Historic towns and villages in Ukraine. Vinnitski Oblast. Kiev URE 1969; Short Jewish Encyclopedia. Jerusalem 1976; Jewish Encyclopaedia in 16 vol. Brokhayz Efron; Encyclopaedia Judaicain 17 vol. Jerusalem.
GAYSIN I:     US Commission No. UA01100102
Alternate name: Ajsin (Yiddish), Daisin (German), Gaissin (Hungarian), Haisyn (Czech), Gajsin (Polish), Hajsyn (English), Haissin (Russian) and Heisin (Ukraine). Gaysin is located in Vinnitskaya at 48º48 29º23, 62 km from Uman and 85 km from Vinnitsa. The cemetery is located at south on Plekhanova Street near sugar factory. Present town population is 25,001-100,000 with 101-1,000 Jews.
  • Town officials: Town Executive Committee-Chairman Tsvigun Aleksandr Vasiliuevich
  • Region Executive Committee-Chairman Zamkovoy Ivan Safronovich [Phone: (043348)1463]. Regional Department of Culture-Rychkovskiy Stepan Vasiliyevich. Gaysin Department of Jewish Culture, Melamud Mikhail Nikolayevich. Vinnitsa Oblast Executive Committee-Melnick Nikola Evtukhovich. Vinnitska Oblast Cultural Society-Ilchuk Nikolay Nikolayevich.
  • Others: Vinnitska Oblast Jewish Community-Gubenko Bella Aronovna.
The earliest known Jewish community was 18th century. 1939 Jewish population (census) was 5190. Effected Jewish Community: 1762-1772 pogroms, 1918-1920 pogroms. At end 1920, Jew community organization was destroyed. The Jewish cemetery was established in 19th century with last known Hasidic Jewish burial in 1960. No other towns or villages used this unlandmarked cemetery. The isolated urban hillside has no sign or marker. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all. No wall, fence, or gate surrounds site. No stones are visible. Nearly 100 memorials are in the new Jewish cemetery in 1970. The cemetery contains no known mass graves. The municipality owns the property now used for industrial or commercial use. Adjacent properties are commercial or industrial and residential. The cemetery boundaries are smaller now than 1939 because of commercial or industrial development. Local residents visit rarely. The cemetery was vandalized during World War II and between 1945 and 1981. There is no maintenance. Within the limits of the cemetery are no structures. Since 1970, a food factory and housing occupies site.
Oks Vladimir Moiseevich of 270065, Ukraine, Odessa, Varnenskaya 17D, Apt. 52 [Phone: (0482) 665950] visited site in 1990, 1991, and 1994. He completed survey on 25/12/1994. Interviewed for this survey was Portnoy G.S., Goldenberg M.I. of Gaysin in /1994. Documentation: Population of Towns in Podol Region.Krylov A. 1905; Population of Towns in the Russian Empire. Vol 4 Podol region 1864; Historical Monuments in Podol-Kamanets Region.Setsinski E. 1911; Geographical-Historic Dictionary of the Russian Empire. Vol 4 1904; National Minorities in Ukraine. Register 1925.
GAYSIN II:     US Commission No. UA01100501
See GAYSIN I for town information. The mass grave is located on the northeastern outskirts on Engel'sa Street. Conflicting description:
The earliest known Jewish community was 17th century. 1939 Jewish population was 10,000. Effected Jewish Community: 1648 pogroms of Khmelnitsky, 1748-1750-pogroms of the Gaydamaki, 1919 pogroms of Petlura and 1941-1943 Jewish ghetto. Living here was Rubby El'kris. The unlandmarked Jewish mass grave was dug in Sept. 1941 with last known Jewish burial in May 1942. Murdered here were Jews from Kuz'mintsy (2km away) and Teplik (2km away). The isolated suburban site with signs or plaques in Ukrainian. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all. No wall, fence or gate surrounds the mass grave. The approximate size of mass grave is now 0.58 hectares. No stones are visible. Water drainage and vegetation overgrowth is a seasonal problem, preventing access. The mass grave has special section for the Jews and other. The site contains marked mass graves. Municipality owns the site now used for mainly Jews burials. Adjacent properties are residential and the road. The mass grave boundaries is larger now than 1939. The mass grave is visited occasionally by organized individual tours, Jewish or non-Jewish private visitors and local residents. This mass grave never was vandalized. Local/municipal authorities cleared vegetation in at 1978 when opening the memorial. Now, authorities clear or clean occasionally. Within the limits of the mass grave are no structures. Moderate threat: uncontrolled access and vegetation. Slight threat: weather erosion, pollution, vandalism, and existing nearby development and proposed nearby development.
Dorman Ida L'vovna of Apt.3, 57 Iv. Franka Street [Phone: 42541] was interviewed. Sokolova Eleonora Eugen'evna of 253152 Kiev, 5 Tychiny Street, Apt. 68 [Phone: (044) 5505681] completed survey.
Last Updated on Thursday, 10 September 2009 12:38
 
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