BARCELONA: Print

The synagogue, originally constructed in the 3rd century, was lost for nearly 500 years and rediscovered about 1990. Refurbished and reconsecrated in January 2006, the synagogue serves Barcelona's current Jewish population.  Lloctinent Palace (15th century) has a facade built from stones ripped from the old Parc de Montjuïch cemetery. The Hall of Archives in the Provincial Archaeological Museum was constructed from tombstones taken from abandoned Jewish cemeteries, the Hebrew inscriptions still visible. The Jewish Quarter is called The Cali.  [January 2000]

History. " Originally built during the fifth century, a new synagogue was later built on top of it in the fourteenth century and additional floors were added to the building in subsequent centuries. Despite perhaps being the oldest synagogue in Europe, the Sinagoga Mayor was forgotten and abandoned until the twentieth century until which point it was used for many purposes including a storage house and dry cleaner." Walking tour. "In 2006, the Sinagoga Major reopened for its first services in more than 600 years. The temple was closed, confiscated, and sold off by the crown following an attack on the Jewish community in 1391." [February 2010]

Parc de Montjuch Cemetery: Overlooking the western section of Barcelona is Montjuich ("Mountain of the Jews" in Catalan) named for the 11th and 12th century extensive Jewish property holdings. Along that slope is the ancient century Jewish cemetery abandoned after the massacres of 1391 and a 12th-century hilltop fortress, now a public park. Some tombstones are in a special room of the Historical Museum of Barcelona in the city's Old Gothic quarter. Source: Israelowitz, Oscar. Guide to Jewish Europe. Brooklyn, NY: Israelowitz Publishing, 1995, p. 288-9. [October 2000]

"El Sementerio  udio de Montjuïc en Barcelona". " EL CEMENTIRI JUEU DE MONTJUÏC A BARCELONA."  Spanish with photos. [August 2010]

Last Updated on Monday, 16 August 2010 11:48