BUCURESTI: Bucuresti County/Ilfov Agricultural District, Wallachia region Print

Alternate names: Bucureşti [Rom], Bucharest [Eng], Bukaresht [Yid], Bukarest [Hun, Ger], Bucarest [Fr], Bukareszt [Pol], Bukurešť [Cz], Bukureshta. 44°26' N, 26°06' E , capitol of Romania. 1900 Jewish population: 40,533. Wallachia region.

Choral Temple (Templul Coral). Address: Str. Sfanta Vineri 9, Tel: (21) 312.21.96. Built in 1867, a red brick temple with choir loft, organ and magnificent Moorish turrets and the largest active synagogue in Bucharest.

Yeshoah Tova Synagogue Address: Str. Tache Ionescu 9. On a busy side street heading toward Piata Amzei from Magheru Bulevard is the only other active synagogue in the Bucuresti. Built in the 1840s with Moorish details and elaborate Aron ha-Kodesh.

county map. information. [December 2000]

Czernowitz Bukovina has cemeter photos [Mar 2014]

Bucharest Cemetery Project needs help!

ROM-SIG is raising funds to photograph approximately 40,000 tombstones in three Bucharest cemeteries. The inscriptions will be translated and the data entered into the template for JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR). The images and inscriptions will be provided to JewishGen and Rom-SIG so that researchers can obtain the information free of charge on JOWBR or through the Rom-SIG website. If you have roots in Bucharest, or family that moved there we need your help in order to help you! This is a vast and expensive project! *Please donate to the Bucharest Cemetery Project here. Because there is up to a two month delay before we get the financial report and we want to have the photographer start photographing some of the headstones since the weather is improving please tell us what you donated here.*We can also use translators for different projects in Romania. Please volunteer here. Please help us to get this project on the road! Source: Rom-SIG Coordinator This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it [April 2012]

The two big Jewish cemeteries in Bucharest are Filantropia Askenazi Cemetery and Giurgiului Sephardic Cemetery. Societatea SACRA (the burial society) has digitized  records (Excel) for all three cemeteries: Filantropia, Giurgiului and Belu Spaniol. Data from the registers which are available at every cemetery. photos and history.

Jewish Cemetery Filantropia,

Address: Bd. Ion Mihalache 91-93. Telephone: (21) 224.03.27. Open: Mon. - Fri 8:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.; Closed Sat. [October 2011]

Sephardic Jewish Cemetery:

Address: Sos. Giurgiului 162. Telephone: (21) 335.86.10. Open: Mon. - Fri 8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.; Sun. 8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.; Closed Sat..Sephardic Jewish Cemetery (Part of the Bellu Spanish Cemetery) Address: Calea Serban Voda 249

July 2012: Unfortunately, this US Commission report is unclear as to which Giurgiului Street cemetery is discussed here. "Grave of Isac Wagner, Before

"The Commission has been working with the Federation of Jewish Communities of Romania to restore 131 gravestones vandalized in an attack on the Giurgiului Jewish cemetery in Bucharest. Commission Member Larry E. Steinberg and former Member Amy S. Epstein and her husband Bruce are responsible for providing $46,000 to restore the stones at the city's largest Jewish cemetery."

website translated with information and photos. "Dating back to 1865, Spanish Rite Hebrew Cemetery is one of the oldest places of eternal rest in Bucharest, this being the graves of famous scholars. Equally important is the Hebrew Cemetery "Giurgiului" which, with a total area of 14 hectares, is the largest of three cemeteries in the Jewish faith in Bucharest. / Spanish Rite Hebrew Cemetery dates from 1865, and the first record in 1867. Sephardim or Spanish Jews emigrated rite of Spain and Portugal in the late fifteenth century in North Africa, the Middle East and some European countries, including Romania. / Main driveway Hebrew Cemetery Spanish Rite is central monument, which was dedicated to fallen heroes on the battlefield during the First World War. Its central symbol - eagle standing guard - means aspiration to freedom. Another monument was erected in memory of the victims of the earthquake of March 4, 1977 who rest in this cemetery.  / Among the personalities who have found rest in Hebrew Cemetery is composer Richard Stein (1909-1992), composer and lawyer of Misu Iancu (1909-1994), journalist and translator Depth Alfons (1913-1979), politician and diplomat Simon Bughici ( 1914-1997), composer Mandy Alexander (1914-2005), actor Sandu Sticlaru (1923-2006), writer Haralamb zinc (1923-2008), pianist and composer Dan Mizrahi (1926-2010). Michael Petroveanu (1923-1977) was a literary critic and historian, writer and translator married Veronica Porumbacu (1921-1977). Both lost their lives in the earthquake of March 4, 1977. Their bodies rest in Spanish Rite Hebrew Cemetery. / One of the most important figures of their ever sleeps here is composer Lawrence Profeta (1925-2006). Its creation includes symphonic music, vocal symphonic, instrumental, choral, musical theater and opera for children. For his artistic creations, was rewarded with numerous awards, including Lifetime Achievement Excellence Diploma at Mamaia Festival 2000, or Grand Prize of the Union of Composers in 1999. /Spanish Rite Hebrew Cemetery is one of the oldest Hebrew cemetery in Bucharest, founded in the latter part of the nineteenth century. There are about 10,000 graves, not only Sephardic."[December2012]

Giurgiului Jewish Cemetery:

website translated with information and photos. "Hebrew Cemetery "Giurgiului" was inaugurated in 1929. Funerary monuments are made of stone, granite or marble, and represents many works of art. Here are many graves of martyrs Hebrew, killed in the Holocaust, as well as Hebrew soldiers who have died on duty, heroes of Romania. During the Second World War, Hitler's Nazis devastated the USSR Hebrew cemeteries and tens of thousands of granite monuments were destroyed or moved. In the cemetery are some of the tombstones that have escaped destruction. Everything here has been designed a platform comprising part of the funerary monuments of the former cemetery in Sevastopol Street, one of the oldest Hebrew cemetery in Bucharest. The construction was done in 2000 to preserve the memory of the thousands of Hebrew, Ashkenaz and Sephardic, who were buried for over two centuries cemetery authorities disbanded in 1942. / Giurgiului cemetery preserves the memory pogrom of 21-23 January 1941. Legionnaires organized attack against the Hebrew community in Bucharest was held by mosaic burning of places of worship and the devastation of thousands of properties. Tragic historical event resulted in significant property damage, injuring dozens of people and loss of 125 lives. 86 were buried in the cemetery of the victims. Two monuments were erected in memory of the over 1,000 Hebrew martyrs who perished at sea in 1942 and 1944. /Hebrew Cemetery "Giurgiului" is the largest of three cemeteries in the Jewish faith in Bucharest. On a total area of ​​14 hectares over 35,000 people are buried." [December 2012]

US Commission Report BUCURESTI I: Bucuresti judet

The cemetery is located at Bv. 1 Mai, no. 91, Bucuresti, Romania. 4426 2606. Alternate names: Bucharest, Bucharest, Bukarest. Current town population is over 100,000 with 1,000-10,000 Jews.

  • Local Authority: Mayor Traian Basescu, Town Hall of Bucharest, Ion Campineanu Str. no. 6-8, tel.: 0040-1-3137424
  • Local and national religious authority: The Federation of the Jewish Communities of Romania, Sf. Vineri Str., no. 9-11, sector 3, Bucharest, Romania.
  • Caretaker: Stanciu Vasile, Bv. 1 Mai, no. 91, Bucuresti

The 1889 Jewish census population registered 43,274 Jews and was 69,885 in 1930. Outstanding members of the Jewish community were: Moritz Schweig (the founder of the paper "Curierul israelit"), Iuliu Barasch (1815-1863), and Mozes Schwarzfeld (1857-1943), both of them Jewish scholars. The cemetery was established in middle of the 19th century. Rabbis: M. Beck (1845-1923); A. M. Beck (1884-1933); Chaim Smuel Schor, Itzhac Schor and Jacob Niemirower are buried in the still-active, unlandmarked, Orthodox cemetery.

The urban flat land, separate but near other cemeteries, has a sign in Romanian that mentions Jews. Reached by a public road, access is open with permission. A masonry wall with a gate that locks surrounds the site.

Approximate pre- and post WWII size is 96100m2. More than 5,000 stones are visible. More than 5,000 are in original location. 20-100 stones are not in original location. Less than 25% of the stones are toppled or broken. Location of stones removed from the cemetery is unknown. Vegetation overgrowth in the cemetery is not a problem. Water drainage is good all year.

No special sections. The oldest known gravestone dates from 1863. The 19th and 20th century marble, granite, and sandstone, slate, and concrete flat shaped and smoothed and inscribed, carved relief-decorated, double tombstones, and sculpted monuments have Hebrew, German, Romanian, and French inscriptions. Some have portraits on stones and metal fences around graves. No known mass graves.

The local Jewish community owns the property used for Jewish cemetery only. Adjacent properties are residential. Frequently, organized Jewish group or pilgrimage tours, private visitors, and local residents visit.
The never vandalized cemetery Maintenance has been re-erection of stones, patching broken stones, cleaning stones, and clearing vegetation in 2000 by Jewish individuals within the country. Current care is regular caretaker paid by the Jewish community of Bucuresti. Within the limits of the cemetery is a preburial house with a tahara and an ohel. No threats.

Claudia and Adrian Ursutiu, Pietroasa Str. no. 21, 3400 Cluj-Napoca, tel: 0040-64-151073 visited the site and completed the survey on 14 July 2001 using the following documentation:

  • Recensamantul general al populatiunei Romaniei din decembrie 1899 (The General Census of the Population of Romania from December 1889), Bucuresti, Lito-tipografia L. Motzatzeanu, 1900
  • Recensamantul general al populatiei Romaniei din 29 decembrie 1930, vol. II (The General Census of the Population of Romania from 29 December 1930, vol. II), Bucuresti, 1938
  • N. Iorga, Istoria evreilor in terile noastre (The History of the Jews of our Countries), Bucuresti, 1913.
  • M. Schwarzfeld, O ochire asupra istoriei evreilor din timpurile cele mai departate pina la anul 1850, (A look at the Jewish History from the beginning until 1850), Bucuresti, 1887
  • C. Iancu, Evreii din Romania 1866-1919 (The Jews from Romania), Bucuresti 1996

They interviewed Stanciu Vasile, 09. 07 2001, Bucuresti. [January 2003]

 

US Commission Report BUCURESTI II:

The cemetery is located at Bucuresti, Soseau Giurgiului, no. 2,

  • Key holder: Stanciu Vasile, Bv. 1 Mai, no. 91, Bucuresti
  • Caretaker: Moise Aurel, Soseau Giurgiului, no. 2, Bucuresti

Outstanding members of the Jewish community were Brunea Fox (writer) and Aurel Fulea (composer.) The cemetery was established in middle of the 19th century. Buried there are Rabbis: Mordehai Elia Eskhenazi (d. 1950) and his wife Roza; Jaacov Hai, Menachem David Almuly (d. 1966) and his wife Simha. The still-active, unlandmarked, Orthodox cemetery urban land, separate but near other cemeteries, has sign in Romanian and Hebrew and Jewish signs on wall or gate. The sign mentions Jews. Reached by a public road, access is open with permission via a masonry wall with a gate that locks.

Approximate pre- and post-WWII size is 40000 sq m. More than 5,000 stones are visible. 20-100 stones are not in original location. 25%-50% of the stones are toppled or broken. Location of stones removed from the cemetery is unknown. Vegetation overgrowth in the cemetery is not a problem. Water drainage is good all year. No special sections. The oldest known gravestone dates from 1870. The primarily 20th century marble, granite, and sandstone, slate, and concrete memorial markers are flat shaped, smoothed and inscribed, carved relief-decorated, double tombstones, and sculpted monuments. Some have portraits on stones and metal fences around graves. Inscriptions are in Hebrew and Romanian. A memorial to Jewish soldiers exists. No known mass graves.

The local Jewish community owns the property used for Jewish cemetery only. Adjacent properties are residential. Frequently, organized Jewish group or pilgrimage tours, private visitors, and local residents visit. The never vandalized cemetery Maintenance has been re-erection of stones, patching broken stones, cleaning stones, and clearing vegetation by local non-Jewish residents and Jews within the country and abroad in 2001. Current care is regular caretaker paid by the Jewish community of Bucuresti. Within the limits of the cemetery is a preburial house. The preburial house has a tahara, catafalque, and an ohel. No threats.

Claudia and Adrian Ursutiu, Pietroasa Str. no. 21, 3400 Cluj-Napoca, tel: 0040-64-151073 visited the site and completed the survey on 14 July 2001 using the following documentation:

  • Recensamantul general al populatiunei Romaniei din decembrie 1899 (The General Census of the Population of Romania from December 1889), Bucuresti, Lito-tipografia L. Motzatzeanu, 1900
  • Recensamantul general al populatiei Romaniei din 29 decembrie 1930, vol. II (The General Census of the Population of Romania from 29 December 1930, vol. II), Bucuresti, 1938
  • N. Iorga, Istoria evreilor in terile noastre (The History of the Jews of our Countries), Bucuresti, 1913.
  • M. Schwarzfeld, O ochire asupra istoriei evreilor din timpurile cele mai departate pina la anul 1850, (A look at the Jewish History from the beginning until 1850), Bucuresti, 1887
  • C. Iancu, Evreii din Romania 1866-1919 (The Jews from Romania), Bucuresti, 1996
  • L. Gyemant, L. Benjamin, Izvoare si marturii referitoare la evreii din Romania, (Sources and Testimonies about the Jews from Romania) vol. III/1-2, Bucuresti, 1999

Claudia and Adrian Ursutiu interviewed key holder. Moise Aurel, 09. 07. 2001, Bucuresti on 9 July 2001. [January 2003]

 

US Commission Report  BUCURESTI III:

The cemetery is located at Soseau Giurgiului, no. 162,

  • Caretaker Bravaf Nicolae, Soseau Giurgiului, no. 162, Bucuresti

The cemetery was established in beginning of the 20th century. The still active, unlandmarked, Orthodox cemetery on urban flat land, separate but near other cemeteries, has sign in Romanian and Hebrew that mentions Jews. Reached by a public road, access is open with permission. A masonry wall with a gate that locks surrounds the site.

Approximate pre- and post-WWII size was 1420002 m2. More than 5,000 stones are visible. More than 5,000 are in original location. 1-20 stones are not in original location. Less than 25% of the stones are toppled or broken. Location of stones removed from the cemetery is unknown. Vegetation overgrowth in the cemetery is not a problem. Water drainage is good all year.

No special sections. The oldest known gravestone dates from beginning of the 20th century. The 20th century marble and concrete flat shaped, smoothed and inscribed, and carved relief-decorated gravestones have Hebrew and Romanian inscriptions. The cemetery contains special memorial monuments to pogrom victims and other: those who died on the Struma ship on their way to Palestine in 1944. No known mass graves.

The local Jewish community owns the property used for Jewish cemetery only. Adjacent properties are residential. Frequently, organized Jewish group or pilgrimage tours, private visitors, and local residents visit. The never vandalized cemetery Maintenance has been re-erection of stones, patching broken stones, cleaning stones, and clearing vegetation by local non-Jewish residents and Jewish residents of the country in 2001. Current care is regular caretaker paid by the Jewish community of Bucuresti. Within the limits of the cemetery is a preburial house with a tahara, catafalque, and an ohel.

Claudia Ursutiu, Pietroasa Str. no. 21, 3400 Cluj-Napoca, tel: 0040-64-151073 visited the site and completed the survey on 14 July 2001 using the following documentation:

  • Recensamantul general al populatiunei Romaniei din decembrie 1899 (The General Census of the Population of Romania from December 1889), Bucuresti, Lito-tipografia L. Motzatzeanu, 1900
  • Recensamantul general al populatiei Romaniei din 29 decembrie 1930, vol. II (The General Census of the Population of Romania from 29 December 1930, vol. II), Bucuresti, 1938
  • N. Iorga, Istoria evreilor in terile noastre (The History of the Jews of our Countries), Bucuresti, 1913.
  • M. Schwarzfeld, O ochire asupra istoriei evreilor din timpurile cele mai departate pina la anul 1850, (A look at the Jewish History from the beginning until 1850), Bucuresti, 1887
  • C. Iancu, Evreii din Romania 1866-1919 (The Jews from Romania), Bucuresti 1996
  • L. Gyemant, L. Benjamin, Izvoare si marturii referitoare la evreii din Romania, (Sources and Testimonies about the Jews from Romania) vol. III/1-2, Bucuresti, 1999

Claudia and Adrian Ursutiu interviewed Bravaf Nicolae, 09. 07. 2001, Bucuresti on 9 July 2001. [January 2003]

Ruth Gruber. Jewish Heritage Travel: A Guide to East-Central Europe. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1992* - 201, 203-207; Synagogue; 206

The Jewish cemetery on Giorgiu Road [?] has a concrete model of the ill-fated SS Struma (carrying 769 Jewish refugees) that hit a mine off the Rumanian coast in 1942 and sank with the loss of all lives except one. Source: Freedman, Warren. World Guide for the Jewish Traveler. NY: E.P. Dutton Inc, 1984. Extracted by Bernard Kouchel, 1994.

Sephardic Cemetery: [?Soseau Giurgiului, no. 2?] The few remaining Sephardim in Romania were assimilated by Askenazim. Only the Sephardic cemetery in Bucharest remains as proof of their former presence. [February 2002]

Last Updated on Friday, 28 March 2014 15:25