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ZYRARDOW: Mazowieckie PDF Print E-mail

Coat of arms of Żyrardów

Alternate names: Żyrardów [Pol], Zhirardov, זשירארדאוו [Yid], Zhirarduv, Жирардув [Rus], Shiraduv, Zheredov, Zhyrardow, Zshirardov. 52°04' N, 20°26' E, 27 miles WSW of Warsaw, 14 miles ENE of Skierniewice, 12 miles SW of Błonie. Jewish population: 2,547 (in 1921). Yizkor: Pinkas Zyrardow, Amshinov un Viskit, (Buenos Aires, 1961). This town in central Poland with 41,400 inhabitants in 2006 in the Masovian Voivodship since 1999 and previously in Skierniewice Voivodship (1975-1998) is the capital of Żyrardów powiat and located on the Pisia Gągolina river. [July 2009]

US Commission No. POCE000221

Zyrardow is located in Wojewodzwo Skierniewickie at 52º3 20º26, 43 km from Warsaw and 73km from Lodz. The address of the cemetery is Ulica Mireckiego 3. Present population is 25,000-100,000 with fewer than 10 Jews.

  • Town: Urzad Miasta, Plac Wolnosci 1, Tel# 36-93.
  • Regional: Wojewodzki Konserwator Zabytkow, 96-100 Skierniewice ul. Pomologiczna 10.
  • Caretaker with key: Genowefa Kubiak, ul. Miereckiego 3.

The earliest known Jewish community is 1874. 1931 Jewish population was 2726. Mieczyslaw Oksner (2 M. 1944) a member of the staff of Pracownik College de France, lived here. The Orthodox, Conservative and Progressive/Reform cemetery was established after 1874 with last known burial 1939-1945. Landmark: the official registrar of Jewish cemeteries, 1981. The urban flat land, separate but near other cemeteries, has no sign or marker. Reached by crossing private property, access open to all with a continuous fence and locking gate. Before WWII and now the size was an approximately .86 hectare. 100-500 gravestones, 1-20 not in original locations and 25-50% toppled or broken, date from 1880-20th century. The cemetery is divided into a men and women's section. The marble, granite or sandstone rough stone or boulders, flat, some have carved relief decorations or sculpted or multi-stone monuments have Hebrew/Yiddish/Polish inscriptions. Some have metal fences around graves. There is a special monument to Holocaust victims. The municipality owns cemetery. Properties adjacent are residential. Frequently, private visitors, both Jewish and non-Jewish, visit. It was vandalized during WWII. Zyrardow Club, New York did restoration in 1968 and 1985, including clearing vegetation and fixing wall. A regular caretaker is paid by contributions from visitors. Within the cemetery is the gravedigger house that used to be the pre-burial house. No threats.

Pawel Fijalkowski, 96-500 Sochaczew ul. Ziemowita 11, Tel. 227-91 completed survey on September 11, 1991 after visiting the site. A photographic archive was also used. An interview was conducted with Genowepa Kubiak, ul. Mireckiego 3, Zyrardow.

  • BOOK: Gruber, Ruth Ellen. Jewish Heritage Travel A Guide to East-Central Europe. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1992. p. 79
Last Updated on Sunday, 09 August 2009 19:04
 
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