MALOGOSZCZ: Swietokrzyskie Print

Coat of arms of Małogoszcz

Alternate names: Małogoszcz [Pol], Maligoshtch, מאלוגושץ [Yid], Malogoshch, Малогощ [Rus]. 50°49' N, 20°17' E, 17 miles W of Kielce, 13 miles N of Jędrzejów. 1900 Jewish population: 465. Małogoszcz is a town in the Jędrzejów County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship. photos. Video. Gmina Małogoszcz is an urban-rural administrative district in Jędrzejów County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, in south-central Poland with the town of Małogoszcz as its seat, 21 km (13 mi) Nof Jędrzejów and 26 km (16 mi) W of the regional capital Kielce. The 2006 total population is 11,758 (out of which the population of Małogoszcz amounts to 3,943). The gmina contains part of the protected area called Chęciny-Kielce Landscape Park. Apart from the town of Małogoszcz, Gmina Małogoszcz contains the villages and settlements of Bocheniec, Henryków, Karsznice, Kozłów, Lasochów, Leśnica, Lipnica, Ludwinów, Mieronice, Mniszek, Rembieszyce, Wiśnicz, Wola Tesserowa, Wrzosówka, Wygnanów, Zakrucze, Żarczyce Duże, Żarczyce Małe and Złotniki. [June 2009]

My interest in Malogoszcz reawokened as a Polish student is doing a Masters Degree in Krakow about the village. She is interested in the EARLY jewish cemetery but we only know of a cemetery from the late 19th century. My CYTRON family lived in Malogoszcz for many years and perhaps as early as the 18th century.  There are jewish vital records for the town from 1826 to 1867 in the LDS collection and the earlier church records from 1810 contain Jewish entries. Kielce-Radom SIG journal vol 1 issue 3 published in 1997 contains an article on page 20 from the Jewish Historical Institute from 1979 about the town and the 18th century jewish population. Journal_Vol 1, No 3_Summer 1997.pdf. There are also some comments from me after the article. The population in Malogoszcz itself was small but it existed. Source:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it [October 2013]

US Commission No. POCE000275

Malogoszcz is located in Kielce at 50º49 20º15, 19 km from Checiny. Cemetery location: between road for Jedrzejowa and the fields and woods. Present town population is 5,000-25,000 without Jews.

  • Town: Wojewodzki Gminy Malogoszcz, 28-366 Malogoszcz, ul. Jedrzejowska 15a, tel. 51-35.
  • Regional: Wojewodzki Konserwator Zabytkow, ul IX Wiekew Kielc 3, Kielce, tel. 45634.

The earliest known Jewish community was about 1882. 1921 Jewish population (census) was 415 (18.9%). The Orthodox and Conservative Jewish cemetery was established about 1882 with last burial in 1942. The isolated suburban flat land has no sign or marker. Reached by crossing private property (agricultural), access is open to all with a broken masonry wall without gate. The present size of the cemetery is 30 sq. m. 20-100 gravestones in the cemetery, all in original locations with less than 25% toppled or broken, The cemetery is divided into 2 sections, men and women. The gravestones date from 1894-20th century. The marble, limestone, and sandstone flat shaped stones or finely smoothed and inscribed stones have Hebrew and Yiddish inscriptions. Some have traces of painting on their surfaces. The cemetery contains special memorial monuments to Holocaust victims but no known mass graves. The municipality owns property used as a Jewish cemetery only. Properties adjacent are agricultural. Rarely, private Jewish visitors stop. The cemetery was vandalized during WWII, but not in the last 10 years. No maintenance, care, or structures. Security and erosion are moderate threats.

Dr. Adam Penkalla, deceased, visited site and completed survey; no interviews.

A Royal edict issued in 1775 forbade Jewish residence in the town, but Jews lived there PROBABLY from around 1789. I know for a FACT that Jews lived there from 1812. Source: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Last Updated on Monday, 14 October 2013 19:53