JODLOWA: Podkarpackie Print

Alternate names: Jodłowa [Pol], Yodlava [Yid], יאדלובה-Hebrew. 49°52' N, 21°18' E, 18 miles SE of Tarnów, 7 miles S of Pilzno. Jewish population: 301 (in 1921). Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego (1880-1902), III, pp. 594-595: "Jodłowa". Jodłowa is a village in Dębica County, Subcarpathian Voivodeship in SE Poland and the seat of the administrative district called Gmina Jodłowa 22 km (14 mi) S of Dębica and 54 km (34 mi) west of the regional capital Rzeszów with a populaton of 4,100. ShtetLink. video. survivor's memoir. The first Jews probably appeared in Jodłow in the 18th century. The kahal was founded in the 19th century, but Jews never represented a significant proportion of the population in Jodłow. In 1882, of 3,282 residents 280 were Jews. 1921 census was 306 Jews or 7.8%. At the turn of the 20th century difficult economic conditions forced many Jews to emigrate. Before the outbreak of WW II, only 195 Jews remained in the village. Jastrun, Polish poet of Jewish origin, spent his childhood in Mieczysław. After the Nazis seized Jodłow, the Jews were subjected to serious repression. They defiled the synagogue and burned holy books. Jewish residents were used for forced labor for the Third Reich. On July 1, 1942, 165 Jews were executed in the forest on the way to "kazni" where German soldiers killed 21 people. A month later, on August  3, 1942, Germans killed another 22 who had hidden in various places. With the Jews the death penalty also killed a few Polish families. [May 2009]

CEMETERY: The Jewish Cemetery was established in the 19th century on the slope Wisowej. Before WWII, a fence with [żerdzi] surrounded it. The cemetery survived the Holocaust; the destruction came afterward when many thieves preyed on the graves. Several matzevot stand and others fell in the forest undergrowth. The cemetery is difficult to find in dense forest and an unmarked area. Directions: after entering the Jodłowej from Ryglice, go toward Wisową. About 1.5 km on the asphalt road, go near the bus station and turn left. The road gradually changes into forest, leading toward Polany with two houses. About 300-500 meters on the right are gravestones. videos of the cemetery: 1 MOVIE * MOVIE 2 and photos. [May 2009]

The Jewish cemetery in Jodlowa reportedly was not disturbed by the Nazis, but was vandalized after the war. Subsequently, it lay neglected and was gradually overgrown in a forested area. Recently, under the direction of the Foundation FPKT and with the participation of the Jodlowa civil authorities, cleanup and restoration of the cemetery has begun. When my extended family visited Jodlowa last week, it appeared that half or more of the cemetery had been cleared of weeds, leaves, and other debris, exposing 100 or so matsevot, many substantially intact. For the most part, the matsevot were lying flat. Inscriptions that could be seen were generally in quite good condition. Plans for the near term include completion of the cleanup of the grounds, turning over the matsevot currently face down and cleaning them, and transcribing all the inscriptions that can be read. Any descendants of Jodlowa wishing to know more about the project, please contact me. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Pepper Pike, Ohio [August 2012]

US Commission No. POCE000021. The US Commission is not finished rechecking this file [2000].
In Tarnow.

gravestone photo and photo. [August 2005]

Last Updated on Tuesday, 28 August 2012 20:07