FRYSZTAK: Podkarpackie Print

[Frysztak flag] Alternate names: Frysztak [Pol], Fristik [Yid], Freistadt [Ger], Frishtak, פֿריסטיק. [Yiddish] 49°50′N 21°37′E, 23 miles SW of Rzeszów (Zheshuv), 31 miles ESE of Tarnów, 9 miles NE of Jasło (Yasla). This village in the Frysztak commune, Strzyżów County, is in the historical region Galicia, Subcarpathian Voivodeship, 17 km from Krosno with 950 total inhabitants. A fair every other Thursday and particularly lively in spring, when many working horses and cattle are sold. Frysztak lies on a hillock at the feet of which the Wisłok rivers flows and on the county road from Rzeszów to Krosno. A second highway leads from Frysztak through Lubla and Sieklowka to Warzyce and on to Jasło. According to tradition Frysztak was founded in 1366 as a German colony by King Kazimierz the Great. The Hasidic leader Rabbi Menachem Mendel of Rimanov lived in Frysztak for many years. ShtetLink. Slownik entry. Yizkors: Pinkas ha-kehilot; entsiklopediya shel ha-yishuvim le-min hivasdam ve-ad le-aher shoat milhemet ha-olam ha-sheniya: Poland vol. 3: Western Galicia and Silesia (Jerusalem, 1984) [May 2009]

The date Jews settled in Frysztaku is unknown, but the first documentation was in the 17th century. Initially, the local Jewish community was subject to Strzyżowa kahal. A significant influx of Jews to Frysztak was in a separate district at the rear end of the market with a synagogue, cheder, and nearby cemetery. In 1794-1798 building across the road from the markets to Strzyżowa by Frysztak and Krosno and then through Czudec to Rzeszów impacted on trade, the majority by Jews representinged almost on- third of the population Frysztak. A dynamic craft development in this guild city is documented in many of the processes used by Jewish craftsmen as Jews wishing to purchase raw materials and then sell their products registered for a specific purpose with the guilds or made specific charges on account, fearing confiscation of their goods .In 1805 a fire destroyed the Jewish area and half the homes in the market. Rebuilding lasted several years due to lack of funds by the Poles, who raised capital raised from their brick houses. Frysztak was sold to local Jews in 1872. Frysztacki Rabbi Wagschal and his wife Rachel, were owners of the majority of local goods. In the 19th century of the 1,400 people living there, only 434 were Catholics and the rest Jews.  The Jewish library had about 1,500 library volumes, a Talmud-Torah school, a number of Jewish associations, such as the Gmilas and Chevra Kadisha existed. In the second half of the 19th century, the inhabitants of surrounding villages had a hard time financially. A fire occurred on May 4, 1890 about 9 a.m. destroying 46 houses and the wooden synagogue, the prayer house, and the Jewish charity hospital. Anti-Jewish problems increased.  On June 16, 1898, people gathered at a market in Frysztaku and destroyed Jewish shops and rioted, killing twelve people. In 1912, Frysztak had 1,484 inhabitants of whom 1,076 were Jews. In the interwar period, the vast majority of trade and craft shops remained in Jewish hands, who accounted for almost three-quarters of the population. During WWII, all synagogues were destroyed, but the Torah of Rabbi Halberstam was taken  to America. [May 2009]

CEMETERY: Today only partially preserved, the cemetery probably dates from the 17th century in an area of old city fortifications on the current ul. Parkowej. In its vicinity was a synagogue. The rectangular cemetery of 70 ares was fenced. Remnants of the old wall can be found at the rear end of the market, the southern part.  About thirty graves, and most of them come from the 18th century,still remain. Before World War II, a tombstone from 1650 was in the cemetery. The center of the cemetery is a small tomb, surrounded by a metal rail, a Chassidic pilgrimmage site, is the burial place of Esther Etel, daughter of the great tzaddik Elimelech Lezajsk who died on December 30, 1800. The inscription says "the virtuous and devout woman, Ester Etel daughter of the famous Chassid, ..., the holy light, the teacher and rabbi Elimelech, of blessed memory, died 14 years of the month of Tevet 561. ...". The second cemetery in the nearby castle area on a small hill near the road to Krosno. A few gravestones remain, but the old fence was destroyed during the construction of settlement's family houses. Several years ago the area was re-fenced. photos. [May 2009]

FRYSZTAK: I US Commission No.POCE000492

Located in Rzeszzowst. Cemetery location is S from Market Sq. For town information see Frysztak (II)
The earliest known Jewish community was in 15th century. 1939 Jewish population was 1400. Rabbi Chaim Baruch Halberstam lived in the town. The unlandmarked Orthodox Jewish cemetery was established in the 17th century with last Jewish burial before WW II. The isolated urban hillside has no sign. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all with no wall or fence. Approximate size of cemetery before WW II was 700 square meters. 20-100, with 1-20 in original location and less than 25%toppled or broken, date from the 18th- 20th century. The limestone, sandstone, rough stones or boulders, or flat shaped stones have Hebrew inscriptions. No known mass graves. Municipality owns property used for Jewish cemetery only. recreational and residential properties are adjacent. Rarely, local visitors stop. It was vandalized during WW II but not in he last ten years. No maintenance. Within the limits of the cemetery are no structures. Security, vegetation and vandalism are serious threats.

Natascha Rode, 35-213 Rzebrow, Starzynswiego 5/29 completed survey and visited site in June 1992. Interviewed was Roman Grodek, ul. Frysztackiepo 31, Frysztak.

FRYSZTAK: (II) US Commission No.POCE000780

Alternate names: Fristik (Yiddish), Twierdza (Polish), Freystath (German). Located in Frysztak, Rzeszow at 49º50 21º37, 30 km N of Krosno. Cemetery location is Parkowa St. Present town population is 1,000-5,000 with no Jews.

  • Town Official: Urzad Gminy, Rynek; 38-130, Frysztak, Tel 110
  • Local: Wojewodzui Konservator Zabythow, 35 Rzeszow Michiewicra 7. Tel 394-61.

The earliest known Jewish community was 16th century. 1939 Jewish population was 2000. Two synagogues were destroyed in 1942. Rabbi Chaim Baruch Halberstam lived in the town. The unlandmarked Orthodox Jewish cemetery was established in the 17th century with last Jewish burial before WW II. The communities of Ciesryni, Tluts, Glink. Luble, and Twierdrs used the cemetery, 100 m from the congregation that used it. The isolated urban hillside has no sign. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all with no wall or fence. Approximate size of cemetery before WW II was 600 square meters. 20-100, 1-20 in original location with less than 25% toppled or broken, date from 1878-20th century. Stones removed from cemetery were used in the construction of roads or structures in Krosno and Rynek. Vegetation overgrowth is a constant problem, disturbing the stones. The limestone and sandstone rough stones or boulders have Hebrew inscriptions. The cemetery contains unmarked mass graves. Municipality owns site used for Jewish cemetery only. Recreational and residential properties are adjacent. Private visitors visit rarely. It was vandalized during WW II but not in he last ten years. There has been no maintenance. Within the limits of the cemetery are no structures. Security, vegetation and vandalism are serious threats.

Natascha Rode, 35-213 Rzebrow, Starzynswiego 5/29 completed survey in June 1992. Interviewed was Roman Grodek, ul. Frysztackiepo 31, Frysztak. She visited in June 1992.

"a few gravestones remained, some of them in use as a walkway." Source: Cohen, Chester G. "Jewish Cemeteries in Southern Poland" from `An Epilogue' in Shtetl Finder . 1980.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 May 2009 18:13