CZUDEC: Strzyżów Print

Coat of arms of Gmina Czudec Alternate names: Czudec [Pol], Chitch [Yid], Chudets, Tchudetz, צ'ודץ-Yiddish. 49°57' N, 21°50' E, 10 miles SW of Rzeszów, 6 miles NNE of Strzyżów. 1900 Jewish population: 410. Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego (1880-1902), I, p. 879: "Czudec". Gmina Czudec is a rural administrative district in Strzyżów County, Subcarpathian Voivodeship, in SE Poland with the village of Czudec as seat, 5 mi NE of Strzyżów and 10 mi SW of the regional capital Rzeszów. The gmina 2006 population was 11,561. Around June 1940, 428 Czudec Jews and 33 refugees sheltering there remained the Rzeszow area. Source. [April 2009]

CEMETERY: The 3700m² cemetery founded around 1900 has only one large matzeva fragment remaining. Other are to be found in the nearby river.[April 2009]

US Commission No. POCE000491

Alternate Yiddish name: Czucz or Czicz. Czudec is at 49º5721º50, 30 km south from Rzeszow. The cemetery was in Czudec-Okop on Rzeszow St. 1992 population: fewer than 10,000 with no Jews.

  • Local: Urzad Gminy, 38-120 Czudec, Tel. 90.
  • Regional: region Konserwator Zabytkow, Rzeszow, Grunwaldcke str. 15, Tel. 37-511.

The earliest known Jewish community in the town was in the 18th century. In the first part of the 19th century, a synagogue was built here beside the 19th or 20th century cemetery. The isolated rural (agricultural) flat land has no sign or marker. Access, turning directly off a public road and crossing private property, is open to all with no wall, fence, or gate. The approximate size of the cemetery before WWII was 700 sq. meters. It does not exist today. There are no gravestones. The private individual owns property now used for agriculture (crops or animal grazing). Properties adjacent are agricultural. Private visitors and local residents rarely. The cemetery was not vandalized during World War II. No threats or structures.

Natascha Rode, 35-213 Rzeszow; Starzynskiego Str. 5/29 completed survey in May 1992 without visiting. Documentation: region Kons. Zabytkow in Rzeszow.

Source: Gruber, Ruth Ellen. Jewish Heritage Travel A Guide to East-Central Europe. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1992. p. 75

Last Updated on Monday, 20 April 2009 14:30