BIERUN STARY: Katowickie Print

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Other Names: [Polish: Bieruñ Stary], Region of Poland: Katowickie. Location: 50°06 19°06, 169.7 miles SSW of Warszawa. The trade route from Wroclaw to Krakow attracted settlement of Jewish merchants and craftsmen. In the first half of the 18th century, only about 12 Jews lived there, but around 1750, the municipality recognized the Jewish religion, not legalized by the state. A private house was used for prayer and a cheder existed. In 1812, when Prussia legalized Judaism, a brick synagogue was built. 1840 Jewish population was 103 people with 254 Jews in surrounding villages, including Imielin. the beginning of the twentieth century, only 20 Jews remained and in Imielin 41. After the part of Upper Silesia went to Poland, a lot of Jews moved to Germany. The former synagogue at ul. Oświęcimskiej now is used as a fire station.[April 2009]

CEMETERY: In 1778, on the outskirts Wit, the Jewish cemetery was established. With about 30 sandstone, rectangular gravestones from the late 18th century and many fragments in an area of about 950 sq m, the cemetery is surrounded by a stone wall built at the end of the nineteenth century. The cemetery gate is decorated with a menorah. The granite monuments are from the interwar period. Inscriptions are in Hebrew and German. In 1994 and 1995, the site underwent renovation. Cemetery photos and photos. Cemetery photos. [April 2009]

US Commission No. POCE000536: The US Commission is not finished rechecking this file [2000].

BOOK: Gruber, Ruth Ellen. Jewish Heritage Travel A Guide to East-Central Europe . New York: John Wiley &Sons, Inc., 1992. P. 74

Last Updated on Monday, 27 April 2009 22:50