AUGUSTOW: Suwalki Print

Coat of arms of Augustów Alternate names: Augustów [Pol], Ogustove [Yid], Avgustov [Rus], Augustavas [Lith], Augustuva [Latv], Agustov, Augustov, Oygstova, Yagestov, Yagistov, Yagustova, Russian: Августов. אױגוסטאװע-Yiddish. 53°51' N, 23°00' E, 50 miles N of Białystok, 18 miles S of Suwałki. Yizkor: Sefer yizkor le-kehilat Augustow ve-ha-seviva, (Tel Aviv, 1966). Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego (1880-1902), I, pp. 53-54: "Augustów" #1. In NE Poland with 29,600 inhabitants (1995), the town lies on the Netta River and the Augustów Canal in the Podlaskie Voivodeship (since 1999), but previously in Suwałki Voivodeship (1975-1998). From 1939 to 1941, Soviet troops occupied the town and exiled many to Kazakhstan, from where some returned six years later. The Nazis occupied Augustów until 1944. WWII destroyed about 70% of the town and most of its residents, mostly several thousand Jews imprisoned in the ghetto between the canal and the river. The Germans murdered practically all of them before they left. Holocaust memorial. Town history. Cemetery photos. [April 2009]

OLD CEMETERY: Old Cemetery was established in the 17th century on ul. Waryńskiego and functioned to the 19th century. Damage to the cemetery left no matzevot. In the 1980s, the cemetery was tidied and fenced. [April 2009]

AUGUSTOW I:   AS 101

Cemetery location: Augustow, ulica Warynskiego. Present town population is 25,000-100,000, with no Jews.

  • Local: Leszek Cieslik-burmistrz, Urzad Miasta w Augustowie, 16-300 Augustow, ulica 3 Maja 60, tel. 21-44. Regional authority: Stanislaw Tumidajewicz-Wojewodzki Konserwator Zabytkow, 16-400 Suwalki, ulica Kosciuszki 7, tel. 663741.

The earliest known Jewish community was about 1674. 1931 population was 2334. The isolated urban flat land has a sign in Polish. Reached by turning directly off a public road, a metal gauze fence with no gate surrounds it. Access is entirely closed. The size of the cemetery is about 0,04 hectares as before WWII. No gravestones or known mass graves are visible. The regional or national government agency owns the property now used only as a Jewish cemetery adjacent to residential properties. Jewish and non-Jewish private visitors and local residents visit rarely. The cemetery was vandalized during World War II. In the late 1980's, the wall was fixed by Jewish individuals abroad. There is occasional clearing or cleaning by the authorities. Within the limits of the cemetery are no structures. There are no threats or drainage or vegetation problems. Dr. Janusz Mackiewicz, 16-400 Suwalki, ulica 1 Maja 27a/47, tel. d.[home] 663756, tel. sl. [office] 663741 completed survey on September 23, 1994.

NEW CEMETERY: Established in 1820 on ul. Zarzecze, single graves and the former caretaker house exist. In 1981, Jews from Augustow erected a monument in in Hebrew, Polish and English that says: "In this cemetery lie thousands of Jews, residents of Augustow and the earth." Students of  Augustowski Gimnazjum at nr 2 im. Sybiraków care for the cemetery. Fundacji Ochrony Dziedzictwa Żydowskiego. More information and  history of Jews in Augustow can be found on the website of Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage. [April 2009]

AUGUSTOW II:   US Commission No. AS102

The Jewish cemetery was established in the early 19th century. No other towns or villages used this unlandmarked cemetery. The suburban flat land, separate but near to other cemeteries, has signs in Polish and Hebrew mentioning Jews. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all, with no walls, fences, or gates. The pre- and post-WWII size is about 3 ha (7.4 acres). 1-20 gravestones, none in original positions with about 25% toppled or broken, date from the 19th and 20th centuries. The location of removed stones is unknown. The limestone and sandstone finely smoothed and inscribed stones, as well as flat stones with carved relief decorations have Hebrew inscriptions. There is a special memorial monument for Holocaust victims. The cemetery contains no known mass graves. The municipality owns the cemetery property now used for a park adjacent to recreational and residential properties, north of the Roman Catholic cemetery, and a War Cemetery of Soviet Soldiers. Jewish and non-Jewish private visitors and local residents visit rarely. The cemetery was vandalized during World War II. In the late 1980's, stones were re-erected by Jewish individuals abroad. There is no care now. Within the limits of the cemetery is a pre-burial home used as a dwelling. Slight threat: weather erosion, moderate threat: vandalism, and serious threat: overgrowth of the forest. Dr. Janusz Mackiewicz, 16-400 Suwalki, ulica 1 Maja 27a/47, tel. d. [home] 663756, tel. sl. [office] 663741 completed survey on September 21, 1994.

Last Updated on Saturday, 25 April 2009 22:46