SCRANTON: Lackawanna County Print

Scranton funeral home: Ziman Funeral Home at (570)344-1716.

For more info, contact The Ziman Funeral Home and call the synagogues to find out who is in charge of their individual cemeteries. Usually each synagogue has a cemetery committee or chairperson.

Scranton-area info and pictures of the restored Providence Cemetery, Source: Herbert Lebovits, Memphis TN [November 2009]

Scranton & vicinity Synagogues:

Beth Shalom Temple - (570) 346-0520

Machzikeh Hadas Congregation - (570) 342-6271

Ohev Zedek Congregation - (570) 343-2717

Temple Hesed (Reformed) (Dunmore) - (570) 344-7201: cemetery still marked with old name of congregation: Madison Avenue Temple

Temple Israel of Scranton (Conservative) (Dunmore) - (570) 342-0350

Chabad of Scranton (O) ph:  (570) 344-8595

Beth Hamedrash Hagadol Cemetery: Source: "Directory of Jewish Local Organizations in the United States", pp. 330-583. American Jewish Year Book 5680 (September 25, 1919 to Sept. 12, 1920); Volume 21. Edited by Harry Schneiderman for the American Jewish Committee Submitted by Alan Hirschfeld.

Dalton Jewish Cemetery: (adjacent to the community of Clark-Summit). Orthodox and serves 15 small synagogues in the area. Dalton was established in 1929. (All Jewish burials in Scranton before Dalton, and perhaps some after as well, were in the Providence Road cemetery. Steve Stein, Highland Park, NJ.

The main cemetery for Scranton is in Dalton, several miles north of Scranton, past Clarks Summit. Get off Route 6 & 11 at the Dalton turnoff, go east for a bit, left on N Turnpike Road, and after a mile, right on Shoemaker Road. There is a non-Jewish cemetery on the right. Dalton Jewish is a few hundred feet up on the left. There is no office, only a caretaker. To get a grave location, you must call Ziman Funeral Home. Perhaps the synagogues have their own records as well. Ziman will take your information and search their records, but there is no master index, only records by year, so narrowing down the year helps greatly. The cemetery is small by New York standards, perhaps only a couple of thousand graves. It is divided into about 2 dozen sections (most have a sign), one for each synagogue or organization. Most have only a hundred or so graves each. I walked five entire organizations in an hour, stopping for a dozen or so graves. If you had no information, you could still walk the entire cemetery in a day.

Keneseth Israel Cemetery: Source: "Directory of Jewish Local Organizations in the United States", pp. 330-583. American Jewish Year Book 5680 (September 25, 1919 to Sept. 12, 1920); Volume 21. Edited by Harry Schneiderman for the American Jewish Committee Submitted by Alan Hirschfeld.

Or Brith Abraham Cemetery: Source: "Directory of Jewish Local Organizations in the United States", pp. 330-583. American Jewish Year Book 5680 (September 25, 1919 to Sept. 12, 1920); Volume 21. Edited by Harry Schneiderman for the American Jewish Committee Submitted by Alan Hirschfeld.

Providence Cemetery: Drive on North Main Avenue past the Memorial Stadium, heading North toward Providence and North Scranton. From downtown Scranton, you would pass Memorial Stadium on your left and a small park on your right. About one mile after the park is a fire station on the left. Park in front of the fire station. The cemetery is behind the firehouse on a hill. Cemetery abuts the backyard of a neighbor to the fire station. You can get a key from the firemen or go around the back where the fence is broken. There are no records for the Providence Road cemetery. It is perhaps 25 feet wide and a couple of hundred feet deep with somewhere around 400 to 500 graves. I looked at every headstone in about an hour. Most stones are quite readable, though there are several with rather elaborate Hebrew-only inscriptions. Many had the English name on the back. Some were not very readable. I was able to identify the grave of my great-great uncle, his date of birth, and little else. Hardly any of the children's graves were readable. Steve Stein, Highland Park, NJ. [December 2000] also see Plains, Shavertown, Swoyerville

The Providence Cemetery became abandoned sometimes in the 1920's when the Jewish community established a new site in Dalton,PA ( as I understand the story).It was unsecured,and was vandalized with trash and overturned gravestones.The Amos Lodge of B'nai Brith,together with the Jewish Federation of Northeast PA,both located in Scranton,undertook the massive clean-up and restoration of these holy grounds,securing the site with a locked gate. Source: Herbert Lebovits, The cemetery abuts a Scranton fire station, Truck #4, Engine # 9, at 1047 N.Main Ave., Scranton.The good firemen at this station are the guardians of the key that allows entry to the restored Providence Cemetery. Source: Herbert Lebovits, Memphis TN [November 2009]

Last Updated on Thursday, 25 March 2010 14:09