MANDOK: Tisza Print

The 1770s census enumerated several Jews in Mandok where an independent Orthodox congregation was established in 1867affiliating many of the smaller Tisza region communities nearby. Mandok affiliated briefly with the Kisvarda congregation. The rabbi, a shokhet, a teacher, and a melamed served the community and synagogue that had a Chevrah Kaddisha, elementary school, cheder, Talmudic study group, library, mikvah, kosher slaughterhouse, and matzoh bakery. The school and a community building were owned by the congregation.Mandok's Jewish officers decorated in World War I, recipients of the Great Silver Karoly Cross In 1938 the Hungarian Government arranged for the establishment of volunteer troops of irregular soldiers (szabadcsapat) to occupy Slovakia, but instead they terrorized the Jews. Following this, many Jews fled the village. In 1941, the Jewish men were taken for foced labor, many of them to the Ukraine. After Passover 1944, the Jews of Mandok were put on wagons and taken to the ghetto of Kisvarda. The town's inhabitants looted what they left behind. Deported before Shavuot, Rabbi Avraham Mayer went with his congregation and perished with them in the death camp. After the war, eighteen men returned from labor and twenty women from Auschwitz. Most of them left the village. [February 2009]

 

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