BEAUNE: (Côte-d'Or département, Bourgogne région) Print

47° 01' 30" N 04° 50' 23" E. 1999 population was 21,923. This commune in eastern France, a sous-préfecture of the Côte-d'Or département in the Bourgogne région with a population of 23,000, is situated on the route des Grands Crus tourist road among vineyards. The area around Beaune, the Côte de Beaune, is known for its Burgundy wines. Beaune's town centre is a tightly clustered, rampart-enclosed vieille ville. Its chief attraction is the fifteenth-century hospital, the Hôtel-Dieu on the corner of place de la Halle. This historic hospital dating back to the 1400s still functions as a retirement home, its primary significance now lies as a tourist attraction. Beaune had a Jewish quarter (ghetto), but Jews had difficulties procuring a piece of land dedicated for burials. The law allowing establishment of a Jewish cemetery was carefully recorded in the public acts. As of 2006, services are held alternately at members' homes monthly and in a place rented for holidays. http://www.beaune.fr/ is the official web site of Beaune, only in French, with photos. [January 2008]

 

Le Cimitiere de Les Baraques de Gevrey: In 1320 the cemetery was on the route to Beaune in a place called "Les Baraques de Gevrey." Philip the Bold, in consideration of the sum of one franc in gold per capita, authorized the Jews of Dijon to own a cemetery close to the city. It was transferred 12 km from Dijon to a locality called "Les Baraques de Gevrey" on the route to Beaune, a hundred paces in the east of the big road (Chemin) (called Courtépée). After the expulsion of the Jews of France in 1306, Jews remained in Burgundy, but their cemetery was no longer tolerated near the city of Dijon. (1373). [January 2008]

 

La Chemin de Fontaine Cemetery: In 1789, on their return to Dijon, the Jews bought a plot on the Chemin de Fontaine, northwest of the city, which was transformed into a cemetery; but it has, for hygienic reasons, been closed for some years. [January 2008]