UDLICE: Chomutov, Bohemia Print

town website [February 2009]

 

 

UDLICE I:     US Commission No. CZCE000265

Alternate name: Eilitz in German. Údlice in Czech. Uldice is located in Bohemia, Chomutov at 50°26′0″N, 13°28′0″E, 4 km SE of Chomutov and 47 km SW of Usti nad Labem. The old cemetery is located at 100 m NE of square. Present town population is under 1,000 with no Jews.

  • Town: Obecni urad, 431 41 Udlice.
  • Regional: Okresni Urad, Referat Kultury, 430 00 Chomutov; and Zidovska Nabozenska Obec, Moskevska 26, 400 01 Usti nad Labem.
  • Interested: Okresni Muzeum (Dr. Samsulova), Paleckeho 86, 430 01 Chomutov, tel.(0396) 5993; and Stani Zidovske Muzeum, Jachymova 3, 110 01 Praha 1, tel.(02) 231-06-34; and Vojtech Bret, Kostnicka 4077, 430 03 Chomutov.

Earliest known Jewish community was second half of 16th century. 1930 Jewish population was 13. Jews moved to big towns in second half of 19th century (637 people recorded in 1858); independent congregation disbanded in 1893. The Jewish cemetery originated in 16th or 17th century with last known Conservative Jewish burial before 1871. Chomutov (Ger: Komotau) and Jirkov (Ger: Gorkau) before 1871; Horenice (Ger: Horschenz) and Bilence (Ger: Billentz) before local cemeteries were founded (4, 6; 3, and 4 km away) used this unlandmarked cemetery. The flat isolated suburban site has no sign or marker. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open with permission via a broken masonry wall, a continuous fence and no gate. The approximate size of cemetery before and after WWII was 0.3553 ha s.

1-20 stones, none in original location, date from probably 18th-20th century. The sandstone flat shaped stones, flat stones with carved relief decoration, or multi-stone monuments have Hebrew and German inscriptions. The cemetery contains no known mass graves but has new buildings of gardeners. The municipality owns the property used for agricultural plots. Adjacent properties are agricultural and residential. Rarely, private visitors and local residents stop. Vandalism occurred prior to World War II 1938, demolished by Nazis and during World War II, disbanded in 1941. Occasional clearing or cleaning by individuals by gardeners. Very serious threat: proposed nearby development. Serious threat: vandalism. Moderate threat: pollution and existing nearby development. Slight threat: uncontrolled access, weather erosion and vegetation.
Jiri Fiedler, z"l, Brdickova 1916, 155 00 Praha 5, tel (02) 55-33-40 completed survey on 10 June 1992. Documentation: Hugo Gold: Die Juden...Bohemens... (1934); Heimatskunde des politischen Bezirkes Komotau (1898); Heimatskunde des Bezirkes Komotau (1929); cadastre of 1843 and 1859; Encyclopedia Judaica Berlin; letter of museum in Chomutov (1982); letters of V.Bret (1982). Other documentation was inaccessible. The site was not visited.

UDLICE II:     US Commission No. CZCE000266

The new cemetery is located 0.4 m NE of square. Interested: Jan Vodrazka, Jiraskova 300, 431 41 Udlice. The Jewish cemetery originated between 1864-1870 with last known Conservative Jewish burial in 1938, two mass graves (about 80 victims of death transport from early 1945). Both Chomutov (German: Komotau) and Jirkov (German: Gorkau) before 1896 (4 km, 6 km away) used this cemetery. The cemetery size is about 60-70% of original Jewish cemetery because of memorials to 1) Soviet prisoners who died in a concentration camp nearby of Udlice; 2) victims of death transport; and 3) Jewish victims of Nazism as 6 stones symbolize 6 million victims). This monument is devastated already and does not serve as a dignified monument. The rest of the unlandmarked cemetery was completely abolished. Several Jewish gravestones lay far in front of the entrance to the memorial. The isolated flat agricultural suburban site has no sign or marker. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all via a continuous masonry wall and non-locking gate. The approximate size of cemetery before WWII was 1439 sq. m.and now is about 800 sq. m.

1-20 stones, none in original location, date from 19th-20th century. The granite finely smoothed and inscribed stones have Hebrew and German inscriptions. The cemetery contains marked mass graves but no structures. The municipality owns property used for Jewish cemetery and memorial. Adjacent properties are agricultural. The boundaries are smaller than 1939 because in new roads or highways and building of the memorial. Rarely, private visitors and local residents stop. Vandalism occurred prior to World War II 1938, (demolished by Nazis); during World War II, occasionally 1945-1991 (the tablet with memorial inscription stolen before 1982). Local/municipal authorities and regional/national authorities did restoration in 1968 and 1986 with vandalism afterward. There is no maintenance. Moderate threat: uncontrolled access, pollution and vandalism. Slight threat: weather erosion, vegetation and existing nearby development.

Jiri Fiedler, z"l, Brdickova 1916, 155 00 Praha 5, tel (02) 55-33-40; and      Ladislav Mertl, Mgr. of Geography, Kubanske namesti 1322/17, 100 00 Praha 10; tel. 02/743213 completed survey on 05-17-92. Documentation: Hugo Gold: Die Juden...Bohemens..(1934); Heimatskunde des politischen Bezirks Komotau (1898); notes of Statni Zidovske Muzeum Praha (1966); letters of C.Brett-see 12 (1892); I.Mala, L.Kubatova: Pochodysmrti (1965); cadastre of 1872; letters of Muzeum in Chomutov (1982); letters of V.Bret (1982); census of 1570, 1858, 1930,1991. The site was not visited.
UPDATE: From World Jewish Congress' Dateline: "Construction workers in Udlice in the Czech Republic have uncovered Jewish tombstones which were used during the 1970s to pave a courtyard of the town hall. Udlice's mayor says the stones will be returned to the Jewish cemetery as soon as possible." [July 1996]

Last Updated on Thursday, 26 February 2009 20:03