LEDNICE: Breclav, Moravia Print

map and photos: "The village Ledenice lies 12 km south-east of the town České Budějovice. The ... village dates back to 1291. ...a fortress and later the courtyard called Landštejn on the small hill near the village...was destroyed in the 15th century. The small village below this was known as Ledenice pod Landštejnem ("Ledenice below Landštejn"). ...Early-Gothic St. Lawrence's Church from the beginning of the 14th century...[had a tower added] in 1782. In the first half of the 19th century the church was renovated. Most of the furnishings come from the 18th century. The composer and collector of folk songs Ferdinand Sládek was born in Ledenice." [February 2009]

Lednice (German name: Eisgrub) is a village that in 1996 was on the UNESCO World Heritage List (together with the twin manor of Valtice/Feldsberg) as "an exceptional example of the designed landscape that evolved in the Enlightenment and afterwards under the care of a single family." It contains a palace and the largest park in the country, which covers 200 km². Since Lednice/Eisgrub first passed into the hands of the House of Liechtenstein in the mid-13th century, its fortunes had been tied inseparably to those of that noble family. The palace of Eisgrub/Lednice began its life as a Renaissance villa; in the 17th century it became a summer residence of the ruling Princes of Liechtenstein. The estate house - designed and furbished by baroque architects Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach, Domenico Martinelli, and Anton Johan Ospel - proclaimed rural luxury on the grandest scale. In 1846-58 it was extensively rebuilt in a Neo-Gothic style under the supervision of Georg Wingelmüller. The surrounding park is laid out in an English garden style and contains a range of Romantic follies by Joseph Hardtmuth, including the artificial ruins of a medieval castle on the bank of the Thaya/Dyje River (1801) and a solitary sixty-metre minaret, reputedly the tallest outside the Muslim world at the time of its construction (1797-1804). Wikipedia [February 2009]

 

US Commission No. CZCE000120

Alternate German name: Eisgrub. It is in Morava-Breclav at 48°48' N, 16°48' E in S Moravia, 29 miles SSE of Brno (Brünn), 4 miles NW of Břeclav (Lundenburg).. Cemetery: 0.8 km W on Mikulovska Street. Present population is 1000-5000 with no Jews.

  • Town: Mayor Engineer Ludmila Rotscheinova, Obecni urad, 691 44 Lednice; tel. 0627/98235.
  • Regional: Engineer Arch. Lydie Filipova, Okresni Urad-Referat Kultury, Masarykovo nam.10, 690 01 Vreclav; tel. 0627/414.
  • Interested: Regionalni Muzeum, Director Dr. Dobromila Brichtova, zamek, 692 01 Milkulov; tel. 0625/2255.

Earliest known Jewish community was after 1670. Jewish community ceased in 1890. 1930 Jewish population was 32. The Jewish cemetery originated in 17th century with last known Conservative Jewish burial before 1942. The isolated suburban hillside has no sign. Landmarked: (Nr. 1378 S.M). Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all via a broken masonry wall and no gate. Size of cemetery before and after WWII: 0.1212 ha.

One walled-up gravestone is in the cemetery. Some stones removed from the cemetery were reburied here and then stolen. The municipality owns the property used as a park. Adjacent properties are agricultural and residential. Rarely, private visitors stop. Vandalism occurred from 1945 on. No maintenance or care. Security (uncontrolled access), weather erosion, pollution, and vegetation are moderate threats. Vegetation overgrowth seasonally prevents access. Vandalism and incompatible nearby development (existing) are slight threats. Incompatible development (planned or proposed) is a serious threat.

Engineer arch. Jaroslav Klenovsky, Zebetinska 13, 623 00 Brno; tel. 0 completed survey on 17 Feb 1992. Documentation: 1. Hugo Gold: Die Juden und Judengemeinden Mahrens (1928); and 2. Jan Herman: Jewish Cemeteries in Bohemia and Moravia (1980). Other documentation exists was too old. He visited site in February 1992. No interviews.

Last Updated on Thursday, 19 February 2009 13:29