KYJOV: Hodonin, Moravia Print

town image. In the South Moravian Region, Kyjob has around 12,000 inhabitants and is famous for its folk festival which takes place every four years.Villages Bohuslavice, Boršov and Nětčice are administrative parts of Kyjov.[February 2009]

 

KYJOV I:     US Commission No. CZCE000118

Alternate German name: Gaya. It is in Morava-Hodonin at 49°0′36″N 17°07′23″E , 45 km SE of Brno. Old Cemetery: 0.4 km SW on Rude Armady Str. Present population is 5000-25,000 with current Jewish population of under 10.

  • Town: Mayor Engineer Jan Letocha, Mestsky Urad, Masarykovo namesti 30, 697 01 Kyjov; tel. 0629/2249.
  • Regional: PhDr. Jaromir Micka, Okresni Urad-Referat Kultury, 695 00 Hodonin; tel. 0628/21834.
  • Information: Vera Weberova, Masarykovo namesti 16, 697 01 Kyjov; tel. 0629/2538 and Karel Adler, Neteicka 2284, 697 01 Kyjov; tel. 0629/2504.

Earliest known Jewish community was in 1603. Jewish population: 884 (in 1869), 319 (in 1930). Jewish quarter was expanded in 1838. Self-standing political community existed 1850-1919. Noteworthy individuals: Ctibor Sonnevend, theater director and Hugo Sonnenschein-Sonka, writer, 1892-1953. The unlandmarked Jewish cemetery originated at the beginning of 17th century with last known Conservative Jewish burial in late 19th century. The isolated flat urban site has no sign. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access restrictions are unknown (private property) with no wall, fence or gate. Size of cemetery before WWII: 0.7687 ha. Present size of cemetery is about 0.4 ha with no stones or structures. Private owners use property for agricultural purposes (crops or animal grazing). Adjacent properties are residential. Compared to 1939, cemetery boundaries are smaller because of commercial or industrial development. Frequently, private visitors stop. Vandalism occurred during World War II. Vegetation overgrowth seasonally prevents access.

Engineer arch. Jaroslav Klenovsky, Zebetinska 13, 623 00 Brno; tel. 0 completed survey on 10 March 1992. Documentation: Hugo Gold: Die Juden und Judengemeinden Mahrens (1928). Other documentation exists but was too old. Klenovsky visited site in February 1992. No interviews.
KYJOV II:     US Commission No. CZCE000119

New Cemetery is 1 km SW on Svatoborska Str. The unlandmarked Jewish cemetery originated at end of 19th century with last known Jewish burial in 1950s. The suburban hillside, part of a municipal cemetery, has no sign. Reached by crossing public hospital, access is open to all via no wall, fence, or gate. Size of cemetery before and after WWII: 0.3348 ha. No stones or structures exist. The cemetery contains special memorial monuments to Holocaust victims: transferred 200 meters to the north. The municipal hospital owns site. Property adjacent to the cemetery is hospital. Rarely, private visitors stop. Vandalism occurred during World War II and between 1945 and ten years ago. No maintenance or care. Pollution, vegetation, and incompatible development are slight threats. Vegetation overgrowth seasonally prevents access. See Kyjov I above for survey information.

Last Updated on Thursday, 19 February 2009 04:23