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Photo of cemetery, p 162 and photos [February 2009]

 

US Commission No. CZCE000280

Alternate names (German): Koschetitz. Czech: Košetice. Town is in Bohemia-Pelhrimov at 49º34 15º08, 15 km NW of Pelhrimov and 35 km NE of Tabor. Cemetery 1200 meters SE of Catholic Church. Present population is under 1000 with no Jews.

  • Town: Mayor Miroslav Bloudek, Obecni urad, 394 22 Kosetice; tel. 0365/98-117 or 98-119.
  • Local: Engineer Vaclav Pesek in Obecni urad. (see above address)
  • Regional: 1. Okresni Urad-Referat Kultury, 393 01 Pelhrimov; tel. 366/3107; 2. Jewish Congregation: ZNO Praha (Ms. Jana Wolfova), Maislova 18, 110 01 Praha 1; tel. 02/231-29-25; and 3. Pamatkovy ustav, namesti Premysin Otakara 34, 370 21 Ceske Budejovice; tel. 038/237-92.
  • Interested: 1. Statni Zidovske Muzeum, Jachymova 3, 110 01 Praha 1; tel. 02/2310634 and 2. Okresni Muzeum, (head, Engineer Jiri Cerny), Masarykovo namesti 12, 393 01 Pelrimov; tel. 0366/2535.

Earliest known Jewish community was first half of 19th century but probably earlier. 1930 Jewish population was 7. 12 Jewish families were permitted before 1848 with 112 paying members of congregation and a rabbi recorded in 1870. Independent congregation disbanded about 1900. The unlandmarked cemetery originated in perhaps 17th century with last known Conservative burial before 1943 but legible from 1932. The wooded flat isolated site has no sign. Reached by crossing public forest, access is open to all via a continuous masonry wall with two gaps and non-locking gates. Size of cemetery before and after WWII was 0.1547 ha.

100-500 gravestones, 1-20 not in original locations and over 75% toppled or broken, date from allegedly 1664 but legible frol 1731-20th century. The granite, limestone, and perhaps gneiss flat shaped stones, finely smoothed and inscribed stones, and flat stones with carved relief decoration have Hebrew, German, and/or Czech inscriptions. Some have traces of painting on their surfaces. The cemetery contains no known mass graves. Within the limits of the cemetery is a pre-burial ruin. Praha Jewish community owns the property used for Jewish cemetery only. Adjacent properties are forest. Rarely, private visitors and local residents stop. Vandalism occurred from 1945 onward. No maintenance or care. Security (uncontrolled access) is a very serious threat due to the secluded location. Forest vegetation overgrowth in the cemetery is a constant problem disturbing graves and stones. Vandalism is a serious threat.

Jiri Fiedler, z"l, Brdickova 1916, 155 00 Praha 5; tel. 02/55-33-40 completed survey on 25 October 1992. Documentation: 1. 1724, 1830, and 1930 Censuses. Other documentation exists but inaccessible: Record Nos. 26 and 59 in archives of Jewish Congregation in Praha. Fiedler visited site in 1992. The mayor and vicemayor were interviwed.

Last Updated on Thursday, 19 February 2009 02:25
 
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