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JEVICKO: Svitavy, Pardubice, Moravia PDF Print E-mail

Alternate names: Jevíčko [Cz], Gewitsch [Ger]. 49°38' N, 16°44' E, 30 miles N of Brno (Brünn).

website in Czech with photo: not landmarked. freely accessible. "Jewish settlements dates from the beginning of the 15th century. Birthplace of composer Richard Falla (1882-about 1943). Jewish Ghetto: the Court today and the western part of Růžové ulice in the northern part of the urban core, most of the original 28 buildings still standing, with mikvah and škola No. 58th. Near the site of the old cemetery (closed in the mid-19th century with tombstones from the 17th century.) Hospice foundation is called Asylum No. 199 from 1910. Soudní ulici Synagogue was built between 1784-94 in the classical style, Art Nouveau and modified in 1907, 1953 converted into a Hussite Church. The facade has a Holocaust memorial plaque from 2000. The old cemetery of unknown age remains behind the gate on the ramparts outside the city walls. Used until 1836, it later served as an orchard. Near the site of the old cemetery (closed with tombstones from the 17th century.) Is called the Hospice Foundation Asylum from 1910. All the tombs, preserved from the 17th century, were taken away during the Nazi occupation of the new cemetery is located 900 meters NW of the square on the road to Zadního Arnoštova.Founded in 1836 (original 5603 m2 area), the last burial took place in 1942 during WWII. Largely devastated by the Nazis, in 1970s it became a park. The ceremonial hall with a stone Ten Commandments in the gable was demolished. Early 1990s in the corner of the cemetery asymbolic group of 25 tombs was errected. Owned by Jewish community in Prague is again since 1997 the foundation hospice No. 269, built in Art Nouveau style in 1910 near the site of the old cemetery in the former 19th century. In 2005 the total reconstruction of the house No. 269, used for residential purposes, mainly consisting in the roof and masonry facades and dehumidification." website in Czech with photo: unlandmarked and freely accessible. "The old cemetery unknown age [in the suburbs] at Chornickou behind the gate on the ramparts outside the city walls. Used until 1836, it later served as an orchard. Near the site of the old and closed cemetery were 17th century tombstones taken away during the Nazi occupation. Called the hospice foundation of Asylum čp.199 r.1910. The cemetery is located 900 meters NW of the square on the road to Zadního Arnoštová. Founded in 1836 [?] (originally 5603 m2 area), the last burial took place in 1942. During WWII the Nazis largely devastated it. In 1970, the site became a park; the ceremonial hall with a stone Ten Commandments in the gable was demolishe. In the early 1990s, a symbolic group of 25 restored tombstones was placed in the corner of the cemetery. Owned by Jewish community in Prague again since 1997, the foundation hospice No. 269, built in Art Nouveau style in 1910 near the site of the old cemetery in the 19th century in 2005 received the total reconstruction. Now used for residential purposes, the roof and masonry facades repaired and dehumidified." [Sep 2011]

The old cemetery was liquidated in 1945. A car shed is on the site. From 100 to 500 gravestones were buried in the new cemetery in 1980-1982 in a still visible mound. The new cemetery, liquidated in 1972, is a park with a small symbolic memorial lapidarium (group of representative stones) to recall the former use of the site. [February 2009]

JEVICKO: (I) US Commission No. CZCE000343

Alternate names: Jevíčko [Cz], Gewitsch [Ger].. Town is in Moravia-Svitavy at 49°38' N, 16°44' E , 42 km W of Olomouc and 30 miles N of Brno (Brünn). Cemetery: Old Cemetery, 80 meters NE of Synagogue in Okruzni Street. Present population is 1000-5000 with no Jews.

  • Town: Mestsky Urad, (Mayor Petr Spacil), namesti Palackeho 1, 569 43 Jevicko; tel. 0462/95-231.
  • Regional: 1. Okresni urad, referat kulty (Director: Leos Cizinsky), Generala Svobody 5, 568 00 Svitavy; tel. 0461/411-11 or 411-42 and 2. Jewish Congregation: ZNO Praha (Ms. Jana Wolfova), Maislova 18, 110 01 Praha 1; tel. 02/2318664.
  • Interested: Okresni Muzeum, (head: Blanka Cuhelova) or (Dir. Elanka Cuhelova), Smetanovo namesti 1, 568 00 Svitavy; tel. 0461/217-04 and 2. Statni Zidovske Muzeum, Jachymova 3, 110 01 Praha 1; tel. 02/2310634.
  • Key: The inhabitants of house at No. 2/269.

Earliest known Jewish community dates from probably second half of 16th century. Jewish population: 286 (in 1890) 86 (in 1930). Peak Jewish population was in the mid-19th century (989 in 1848, i.e., 33% of total population); later, Jews moved to big towns. In fire of 1869 on Jew Street, archives of congregation burned. Jew Street was a self-standing political community between 1848 and 1919. Noteworthy individuals: Rabbi Baruch ben Menachem Mandl Braunschweig (d. 1719) and native town of composer Richard Fall (probably 1882-1943). The unlandmarked Jewish cemetery was recorded in the 17th century. Rabbi Braunschweig is buried here. 1836 was last known Conservative Jewish burial. The flat isolated urban site has no sign. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open with permission via a continuous fence and locking gate. Size of cemetery before WWII: 0.3435 ha. Present size is about 0.25 ha.

No stones are visible. Several tens of tombstones probably are buried in the new cemetery. [see Jevicko II] The cemetery contains no known mass graves. Sn agricultural association, "Zemedelske Zdruzeni" owns property used for garden, residences, and car sheds. Adjacent properties are residential. Compared to 1939, cemetery boundaries are smaller because of private car sheds. The property is never visited as a cemetery. Prior to World War II, a Jewish congregational old-people's home was built here. After 1941, the Nazis removed tombstones. Between 1945 and ten years ago, car-sheds were built. No maintenance and only care is of the garden. Within the limits of the former cemetery is the former Jewish old-people's home.

Jiri Fiedler, z"l, Brdickova 1916, 155 00 Praha 5; tel. 02/55-33-40 completed survey on 31 August 1992. Documentation: 1. Cadastre of 1834; 2. Frantisek Plech: Jevicko a Zide v historii (1992); 3. Emil Tutsch: Stare Jevicko (1937); and 4. Die Juden and Judengemeinden Mahrens (1929) [sic]. Fielder visited site in 1990 and conducted no interviews.

JEVICKO II:     US Commission No. CZCE000098 and No. CZCE000344

The cemetery, known as Gewitsch in German, is located 800 W, near the road to Zadni Arnostov.

  • Caretaker: Jaroslav Ambroz, Svitavska 533, 569 43 Jevicko; tel. 0462/95-282.
  • Other sources: Frantisek Plech "Jevicsky spravovaj" 569 43 Jevicko and Dag Hruby, K.H. Borovskeho 476, 569 43 Jevicko.

The Jewish cemetery originated in 1836 with last known Conservative Jewish burial before 1943. The cemetery might be listed as a monument. [yes (until 1972) and no (after 1972)]. Isolated and flat, the rural (agricultural) suburban site has no sign or marker. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all. A hedge or row of trees or bushes but no gate surrounds. Size of cemetery before and after WWII: 0.5743 ha.

1-20 gravestones transferred from the old cemetery, none in original location with 25%-50% toppled or broken, date from 1802-20th century.100-500 tombstones were buried here about 1980-82. The granite, limestone, and sandstone flat shaped stones or flat stones with carved relief decoration have Hebrew and German inscriptions. The cemetery contains no known mass graves. Praha Jewish community owns the site used as follows: a small part is a symbolical cemetery [lapidarium]; and the main part of the former cemetery is now a park with a mound from buried tombstones. Adjacent properties are agricultural. Occasionally, private visitors and local residents stop. Vandalism occurred during World War II and since then. The original cemetery was demolished in the 1970's. A small lapidarium was formed after 1980. Praha Jewish Congregation pays the caretaker. Within the limits of the cemetery are no structures. Security (uncontrolled access) and vandalism are serious threats to this secluded spot. Pollution is a moderate threat. Weather erosion is a slight threat.

Engineer Mojmir Maly, Ve Stresovickach 58, 169 00 Praha 6; tel. 02/35-57-69 and Engineer arch. Jaroslav Klenovsky, Zebetinska 13, 623 00 Brno; tel. 000 on 24 May 1992. Documentation: Hugo Gold: Die Juden und Judengemeinden Mahrens (1928); Jan Herman: Jewish Cemeteries in Bohemia and Moravia (1980); cadastra and census. Klenovsky and Maly conducted no interviews but visited site in 1991 and 1992.

Last Updated on Friday, 07 October 2011 11:23
 
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