Eastern Europe The IAJGS International Jewish Cemetery Project mission is to catalogue every Jewish burial site throughout the world. Every Jewish cemetery or burial site we know of is listed here by town or city, country, and geographic region is based on current locality designation. http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/index.html Tue, 23 May 2017 04:57:16 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb BURGAS: [Bourgas, Burgaz, Pirgos, Bourgas, Burghaz] http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/burgas-bourgas-burgaz-pirgos-bourgas-burghaz.html http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/burgas-bourgas-burgaz-pirgos-bourgas-burghaz.html Coat of arms of BurgasAlternate names: Burgas [Bulg], Burgaz [Turk], Pirgos [Grk], Bourgas, Burghaz. 42°30' N, 27°28' E, on the Black Sea. 2011 population: 200,271. 1901 Jewish population: 641 Jews out of a total of 5,000. The former synagogue constructed in 1905-09, incorporates both neoclassical and Byzantine elements. In the 1960s the synagogue was transformed into a civic cultural center, the Petko Zadgorski Art Gallery. Announcement of a restoration project for the building in 2009 stated that it was actually the work of Austrian architect Friedrich Grunanger, who designed the Great Synagogue is Sofia. The small Jewish community in Burgas uses the building next door as its community center. Metropolitan Simeon St 24. Tel: +359 56/84-21-69

CEMETERY:

Since 1600, a Jewish community was present in Burgas although just over 100 people constitute the community. On the road from the "sunny" beach resort, the still active Jewish cemetery is part of the municipal cemetery established at the end of the 19th century. Many gravestones were lost when an earlier cemetery was destroyed and the new location established. The present 0.2 hectare site contains approximately thirty visible gravestones dating from the 19th and 20th centuries. Within the municipal cemetery complex, the Jewish section boundaries are unmarked. Although maintained by a caretaker, water drainage is a constant problem. In the immediately cemetery sections are  Armenian and Turkish heritage burials. Source: US Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad. [Sept 2014]


 

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phrases1@aol.com (Ellen Renck) Bulgaria Tue, 02 Sep 2014 14:35:22 +0000
CHIRPAN [Shirpan, Čirpan, Tchirpan, Tschirpan] Stara Zagora Province http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/chirpan-shirpan-irpan-tchirpan-tschirpan-stara-zagora-province.html http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/chirpan-shirpan-irpan-tchirpan-tschirpan-stara-zagora-province.html Alternate names: Čirpan, Tchirpan, Tschirpan (Bulgarian: Чирпан). 42°12' N 25°20' E, 108.0 miles ESE of Sofiya . This town on the Tekirska River in south central Bulgaria is the administrative centre of the homonymous Chirpan Municipality. 2009 population: 16,355. Chirpan is located north of the Maritsa River on the Chirpan highlands, SE of the Sredna Gora Mountains. The town is a center for wineries and viticulture.

 

CEMETERY:

The site of original cemetery located in the current center of the town is now a bus station. The town cemetery has a separate Jewish section included in the route of a recently constructed highway. Many gravestones were destroyed or built over during the construction. The remaining gravestones were removed. Location unknown. [Sept 2014]


 

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phrases1@aol.com (Ellen Renck) Bulgaria Tue, 02 Sep 2014 15:04:18 +0000
DUPNITSA: [Dupnica, Stanke Dimitrov, Stanke Dimitrovo, Marek, Dupniza, Dupnica, Dubnica, Doupnitza, Dupnica Stanke Dimitrovo, Marek, Dupniza, Dupnica, Dubnica, Doupnitza, Dupnica] in Kyustendill Province http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/dupnitsa-dupnica-kyustendil.html http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/dupnitsa-dupnica-kyustendil.html Coat of arms of Dupnitsa Alternate name:Dupnitsa Дупница [Bulg], Stanke Dimitrov [Bulg, 1948-89], Stanke Dimitrovo, Marek, Dupniza, Dupnica, Dubnica, Doupnitza, Dupnica] (previously Дубница))   42°16' N, 23°07' E, in W Bulgaria, 31 miles SSW of Sofiya. The town in SW Bulgaria at the foot of the highest mountain in the Balkan Peninsula, the Rila Mountain is the second largest city in Kyustendil Province and in the first half of the 20th century was bigger than the current administrative center, Kyustendil. A Jewish community existed in Dupnitza since the 16th century. A synagogue was present as early as 1578. During WW II, no deportation of Bulgarian Jews of the former Bulgarian territories occurred.However, over 4,000 Jews from portions of Greece and Yugoslavia annexed by Bulgaria were arrested on 4 March 1943 and deported to an internment camp in Dupnitza. After ten days in the Dupnitza camp, on 18-19 March, they were transferred by train to Lom on the Danube. [Sept 2014]

Sephardi Jews came from Thessaloniki (Salonika) in 1536.1910 Jewish popuation: 1,150 out of 8,000. Until 1907 most of the community lived around the town's Jewish spa. Dupnitsa has had a synagogue since the late sixteenth century but the current building dates from 1859. Its main gate faces the interior courtyard. The exterior has decorative stonework and a beautiful dome with six windows in rows.

CEMETERY:

Address: 143, St. Ivan Rilski Str.  The cemetery was established sometime in the 16th century with the last known Jewish burial in 1979. The granite and sandstone gravestones are inscribed in Bulgarian and Hebrew. The 13.5 hectares cemetery on a hillside has no fence or gate. The reduced cemetery boundaries result from a surrounding housing development and a paved path that now cuts through the center of the site (maybe over some of the graves). The moderately overgrown site has water drainage problems. Vandalized with several gravestones stolen or toppled over the years, the local Jewish community owns the cemetery, but lacks funds to care for it.

Images at US Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage abroad. [Sept 2014]


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phrases1@aol.com (Ellen Renck) Bulgaria Tue, 02 Sep 2014 15:22:12 +0000
GIGEN http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/gigen.html http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/gigen.html GIGEN:
Hebrew tombstones found near Oescus (now Gigen) are from a colony of Greek Jews from Salonika, who arrived in Sofia in the second century. Source: Freedman, Warren. World Guide for the Jewish Traveler. NY: E.P. Dutton Inc, 1984.

Town information can be found at News Guide Bulgaria. "The village of Gigen located in North-Central Bulgaria, on the Danube, close to the place where the Iskar River empties into it, opposite the Romanian town of Corabia. The village is included in Municipality Gulyantsi (Pleven District). Gigen is most famous for being built on the site of the important Roman colony of Oescus. The extensive ruins are located in the northwestern part of the village and were first associated with the ancient colony in the end of the 17th century." [February 2009]
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jhallgarten@gmail.com (Jason Hallgarten) Bulgaria Wed, 21 Jan 2009 13:40:09 +0000
GOTSE DELCHEV: [Gotsi Delchev, Nevrekop [Nevrokop, Newrokop, Gotze Deltchev] Blagoevgrad Province http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/gotse-delchev-gotsi-delchev-nevrekop-nevrokop-newrokop-gotze-deltchev-blagoevgrad-province.html http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/gotse-delchev-gotsi-delchev-nevrekop-nevrokop-newrokop-gotze-deltchev-blagoevgrad-province.html Official seal of Gotse Delchev Alternate Names: Gotsi Delchev, Nevrekop, Nevrokop, Newrokop, Gotze Deltchev. 41°34' N 23°44' E, 80.0 miles SSE of Sofiya. In 1951 the town was renamed after the Revolutionary hero Gotse Delchev. It had hitherto been called Nevrokop (in Bulgarian:Неврокоп, Nevrokop; in Greek: Νευροκόπι, Nevrokopi; and in Turkish: Nevrokop). Nearby are the remains of a walled city established by the Romans in the 2nd century AD. former temple: One Jewish family remained in the town during WWII to maintain the town's temple while all the others fled. The temple  on one of the town market squares amid cheap stores is known among the population as "the Havre" and was converted into the family's home. Part of the exterior remains as it always was with a rounded dome topped with the Star of David. However, the interior is a mix of storage and apartments. No Jews remain in the town.

CEMETERY:

58 Drama Str. The Jewish cemetery is part of the municipal cemetery. Established at the end of the 18th century, the last known Jewish burial was in 2000. The cemetery's entrance has a bronze double door locking gate with decorative bars and Mogen David motif set within the larger cemetery's high wall. The 150 square meters cemetery contains about thirty visible granite and marble gravestones with inscriptions in Bulgarian, Hebrew, and Ladino. Although a regular caretaker at the site remains, vegetation overgrowth and water drainage are constant problems.

US Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad has photos. [Sept 2014]


 


 

 

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phrases1@aol.com (Ellen Renck) Bulgaria Tue, 02 Sep 2014 15:39:36 +0000
HASKOVO: [Khaskovo, Hasköy, Chaskowo,Chaskovo, Haskovo, Haskiöj, Chasköi] http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/kaskovo-khaskovo-haskoey-chaskowochaskovo-haskovo-haskioej-chaskoei.html http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/kaskovo-khaskovo-haskoey-chaskowochaskovo-haskovo-haskioej-chaskoei.html Coat of arms of HaskovoAlternate names: Khaskovo or Хасково [Bulg], Hasköy [Turk], Chaskowo [Ger, Pol], Chaskovo, Haskovo, Haskiöj, Chasköi. 41°56' N, 25°33' E, in S Bulgaria, 125 miles ESE of Sofiya, 44 miles ESE of Plovdiv. Haskovo  is a city and the administrative center of the Haskovo Province in southern Bulgaria, not far from the borders with Greece and Turkey. population: 184,731. [Sept 2014]

 

CEMETERY:

Plovdiv Road. The Jewish cemetery section of a municipal cemetery was established around 1830 and contains about 40 19th century gravestones, some with portraits on them. The granite, marble and limestone gravestones have Hebrew and Bulgarian inscriptions. A masonry wall with a gate that locks surrounds the site. No caretaker. Relatives of the deceased do some maintenance work. About 35 Jews still live in Haskovo.

 

 

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phrases1@aol.com (Ellen Renck) Bulgaria Tue, 02 Sep 2014 16:29:48 +0000
HOPESIN http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/hopesin.html http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/hopesin.html phrases1@aol.com (Ellen Renck) Bulgaria Sun, 08 Feb 2009 21:10:33 +0000 KARNOBAT: [Karnabat, Karnobat, Poljanovgrad, Polyanovgrad] Burgas Province http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/karnobat-karnabat-karnobat-poljanovgrad-polyanovgrad-burgas-province.html http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/karnobat-karnabat-karnobat-poljanovgrad-polyanovgrad-burgas-province.html Карнобат, Karnabat, Karnobat, Poljanovgrad, Polyanovgrad. 42°39' N 26°59' E, 186.2 miles E of Sofiya. December 2009 town population: 18,480. A Jewish community was established in Karnobat in the 16th century.

Wikipedia [Sept 2014]

CEMETERY:

Old Jewish Cemetery:

The expansive Jewish cemetery dates from the 17th-19th centuries. The largest pre-20th century Jewish burial ground in Bulgaria, the oldest section has flat gravestones that cover the open hillside, many with long, beautifully-carved epitaphs. A large farm borders the perimeter as sheep graze on parts of the cemetery to contain the grass. If the farm encroached on the site, no one knows as no Jews live in the area today.  The organization Shalom financed a gravestone inventory by the Bulgarian Archaeology that re-erected some gravestones. The Diaspora Research Institute of Tel Aviv University videotaped all gravestones in the cemetery. Construction of a nearby highway interfered with the work but was prevented from damaging the cemetery.

New Jewish Cemetery:

Part of the town's municipal cemetery, the 20th century site contains about fifty granite and limestone gravestones with Hebrew and Bulgarian inscriptions. The overgrown site's wire fence has a gate that locks.

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phrases1@aol.com (Ellen Renck) Bulgaria Tue, 02 Sep 2014 17:15:48 +0000
KAZANLAK: Stara Zagora Province, [Kasanlăk, Kazanlăk, Kazanlek, Kazanlik, Kazanlk, Kazanlŭk] http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/kazanlak-stara-zagora-province-kasanlk-kazanlk-kazanlek-kazanlik-kazanlk-kazanlk.html http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/kazanlak-stara-zagora-province-kasanlk-kazanlk-kazanlek-kazanlik-kazanlk-kazanlk.html Alternate names: Kasanlăk, Kazanlăk, Kazanlek, Kazanlik, Kazanlk, Kazanlŭk/Казанлъ̀к [Bulg], Σευθόπολις (Seuthopolis) in Greek and Thracian. 2011 population: 47,325

This center of rose oil extraction is known as The Town of Roses. Source [Sept 2014]

"In the small Balkan town of Kazanlak an ancient Jewish coin, reputed to be the only one in existence in the entire Balkan area, was recently discovered. The coin dates back to 138 B.C.E." Source [Sept 2014]

CEMETERY:

"There are no Jews in Kazanlak now, but a part of Kazanlak's Jewish cemetery survives, but most of it was demolished to make room for the Kazanlak bypass. About a dozen graves remain, most in an appalling condition. At the entrance of the now unfenced and unguarded cemetery stands a lonely Christian effigy of a weeping woman. The inscription on it has been obliterated by the elements, but according to local hearsay the woman buried here, had been excommunicated by the Orthodox Church. The reasons for this have been lost through the years, but the poor lady was banned from the Christian section of the cemetery and instead, her body was laid to rest with the Jews. Kazanlak's Jewish cemetery also used to be the last resting place of 22 Bulgarians sentenced to death by the Communist."  Source [Sept 2014]

The Stadiona Quarter Jewish cemetery has about 500 visible limestone gravestones, mainly from the 19th century with Hebrew, Bulgarian, and Ladino inscriptions. The last known Jewish burial in the unlandmarked cemetery was 1960. Vegetation overgrowth is a year-round problem while water drainage is a seasonal problem. see photos from US Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad.


 

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phrases1@aol.com (Ellen Renck) Bulgaria Tue, 02 Sep 2014 17:51:46 +0000
KYUSTENDIL: [Köstendil, Kjustendil , Velbazhd, Küstendil, Kiousténdil, Keustendil] http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/kyustendil-koestendil-kjustendil-velbazhd-kuestendil-kioustendil-keustendil.html http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/bulgaria/kyustendil-koestendil-kjustendil-velbazhd-kuestendil-kioustendil-keustendil.html Coat of arms of Kyustendil Alternate names: Kyustendil and Кюстендил [Bulg], Köstendil [Turk], Kjustendil [Ger], Velbazhd, Küstendil, Kiousténdil, Keustendil. 42°17' N, 22°41' E, in W Bulgaria, near the borders with Serbia and Macedonia. 42 miles SW of Sofiya. The town is famous for its spa and mineral waters. Whilte the majority of the population are Orthodox, several Christian denominations and a small Jewish community exist. During Ottoman rule, the Turkish population were Muslim, but of the many mosques, only two remain.

"In the 16th century this town had a small Jewish community. In 1878 when Bulgaria gained its independence, the community numbered 853 and grew steadily. They were artisans, merchants, porters, etc. The merchants among them dealt in plums, wool, butter, and tobacco. The local synagogue was built in 1863. In 1874 a *blood libel against the Jews spread, when a Christian child was missing; there were also anti-Jewish riots in 1901 for the same reason. The 1935 census gave the number of Jews as 853, while the 1943 census listed 980 Jews. The community did not suffer severely during World War II. The 1943 expulsion decree from Bulgaria was not carried out. In 2004 there was a community of around 90 Jews affiliated with the local branch of the nationwide Shalom organization." Source [Sept 2014]

Wikipedia [Sept 2014]

Partisans [Sept 2014]

Town video [Sept 2014]

CEMETERY:

Cemetery video [Sept 2014]

The new cemetery is situated 1.5 km east of the center of Kyustendil. The original Jewish cemetery was on the left hill of the Adjundarski gorge, near the Katranlia mahala (residential district). The municipal cemetery was near the Sveti Mina church but these cemeteries violated the local health law. They also impeded the town's development. In 1894, the municipal cemetery was moved between the road to Sofia and the road to Dupnitza, far enough from the town and not on arable land. In 1900, the Jewish cemetery moved to an adjacent location and was used until 1951. The 1.9 hectares site contains about 600 visible gravestones with Hebrew and Bulgarian inscriptions. No wall or fence surrounds the site. The cemetery repeatedly was vandalized between 1989 and 1999 and is in a very poor condition. Many gravestones were destroyed by nationalists in 1994 . The police did not find the perpetrators. 80% of the gravestones are broken or stolen. Several attempts to restore the cemetery were too costly. The cemetery was maintained by Shalom-Kyustendil and a regular caretake so vegetation is cut regularly.  Water drainage is not a problem.

Kyustendil Jewish cemetery, 2010 | Facebook [SEPT 2014]


 


 

 

 


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phrases1@aol.com (Ellen Renck) Bulgaria Tue, 02 Sep 2014 18:12:53 +0000