CHERYKAW (Cherikov): Mogilev Print

53°34'N 31°23' E, 158 mi E of Minsk. Alternate names: Cherykaw [Bel], Cherikov [Rus, Yid], Czeryków [Pol], Tscherikow, Čerykaŭ. According to the Jewish Encyclopeida, Cherikov is on the River Sozh, 77 km SE of Mogiliov and 32 km from the railway station, Krichev, Chaussy dates from 1648 when Ladislaus, King of Poland, granted Jews of Cherikov a charter to deal in liquors, grain, and other rade, to acquire immovable property, and to have their own synagogue and cemetery exempted from taxation. In that same year, the Jews of Cherikov were massacred by the Cossacks. After the first partition of Rzecz Pospolita, Cherikov became part of the Russian Empire. At the end of the 18th century, the town had three wharves, big horse fairs, and a sugar refinery. 1897 Jewish popualation was 5,200 or 2,700 Jewish small tradesmen: 12 in horticulture and 10 in gardening. In Cherikov District, 60 Jewish farmers, 255 artisans (155 shop-owners, 10 wage-workers, and 90 apprentices), 115 tailors, 25 journeymen, and 8  working in thel Dutch tile-factory. Belarus SIG reference [March 2009]

 

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 March 2009 00:56