BARANAVICHI: Brest Obl;ast, [BARANAVICI, BARANOVICHI, BARANAVICHY,BARANOWICZE, BARANOVICH, BARANOVITCH, BARANOVITSH, BARANOVITS, BARANOVITSH, BARANOVICHE, BARANAVIČY [ Print

Official seal of Baranovichi ALTERNATE NAMES: BARANAVICHY Баранавічы. [BEL], BARANOVICHI and БАРАНОВИЧИ[RUS], BARANOWICZE [POL], BARANOVICH באראנאוויטש [YID], BARANAWITSCHY [GER], BARANOVIČIAI [LITH], BARANOVITCH, BARANOVITSH, BARANOVITS, BARANOVITSH, BARANOVICHE, BARANAVIČY. 53°08' N, 26°02' E, 70 miles N of Pinsk, 33 miles SSE of Navahrudak..1900 Jewish population: 2,171.

CEMETERY:

  • "The site of the old Jewish cemetery. Aside from a marker that was placed there several years ago and one tombstone that Mr. Turetzky had stumbled across one day, the small, gated expanse bears few reminders of the Jewish presence in the city. During the war, this cemetery was also the site of a mass murder by the German Einsatzkommando." Source see photos.
  • photo and website in Hebrew [Apr 2014]
  • photo [Apr 2014]
  • Jewish cemetery in Baranovichi is fenced off and nicely kept, thanks to the work of the Baranowitzer Society of Israel and a local man, Schmuel Kaplan, who was my host. There are memorials there. One gravestone turned on its side supposedly covered the crypt of the Halperin family, one of the prominent families before the W.W.II. Kuncevitsky, Turevsky, Vinograd and Slucjac stones are in the foundations of surrounding buildings. There are also memorials at the two mass grave sites. One is where the Germans themselves reported killing 19,000 Jews around July 31, 1942. The report is available from the Nizkor Project on the Internet. The other is at the site where 3,000 Czech intellectuals were executed after being taken off a train from Czechoslovakia, supposedly for a rest stop. Visit was May 5-9, 1977. Sources: Larry S. Goldblatt, M.D., This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it [1999]
  • My Memoirs From Palonkeh and Baranovichi, Belarus, 1904 to 1922" [October 2000]and Belarus SiG newsletter article.[October 2000]

    photos. [February 2010]

    • "After the demise of the Soviet Union and the independence of Belarus a marker was placed on that spot with the help of a Baronovich survivor and decorated partisan commander, Moshe Zalmanovich. Mr. Zalmanovich, who is retired and lives in Israel, travels often to Baranovich, in part, because his wife Wanda still has family in the city. The two met during the war when her family risked their lives to save him. After the war, Wanda chose to follow him to Israel, where she has lived for the past 40 years as a convert. When the memorial was desecrated several years ago by anti-Semites, Mr. Zalmanovich helped pay for its renovation out of his own pocket." Source see photos. Copyright © 1999 Belarus SIG and This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it (both text and photos)

      Official seal of Baranovichi ALTERNATE NAMES: BARANAVICHY Баранавічы. [BEL], BARANOVICHI and БАРАНОВИЧИ[RUS], BARANOWICZE [POL], BARANOVICH באראנאוויטש [YID], BARANAWITSCHY [GER], BARANOVIČIAI [LITH], BARANOVITCH, BARANOVITSH, BARANOVITS, BARANOVITSH, BARANOVICHE, BARANAVIČY. 53°08' N, 26°02' E, 70 miles N of Pinsk, 33 miles SSE of Navahrudak..1900 Jewish population: 2,171.

  • JewishGen Belarus SIG
  • Museum of the History of Polish Jews
  • Shtetl Finder (1989), pp. 3-4: "Baranovitch".
  • Pinkas HaKehilot, Poland, Vol. 8 (2005), p. 176-187: "Baranowicze"
  • Encyclopedia of Jewish Life (2001), p. 88: "Baranowicze".
  • History [Apr 2014]
  • Jewish Virtual Library [December 2015]
  • Hebrew Name Index to Lechovicher and Baranovicher Burials around the World by Deborah G. Glassman, copyright 2008

CEMETERY:

  • "The site of the old Jewish cemetery. Aside from a marker that was placed there several years ago and one tombstone that Mr. Turetzky had stumbled across one day, the small, gated expanse bears few reminders of the Jewish presence in the city. During the war, this cemetery was also the site of a mass murder by the German Einsatzkommando." Source see photos.
  • photo and website in Hebrew [Apr 2014]
  • photo [Apr 2014]
  • Jewish cemetery in Baranovichi is fenced off and nicely kept, thanks to the work of the Baranowitzer Society of Israel and a local man, Schmuel Kaplan, who was my host. There are memorials there. One gravestone turned on its side supposedly covered the crypt of the Halperin family, one of the prominent families before the W.W.II. Kuncevitsky, Turevsky, Vinograd and Slucjac stones are in the foundations of surrounding buildings. There are also memorials at the two mass grave sites. One is where the Germans themselves reported killing 19,000 Jews around July 31, 1942. The report is available from the Nizkor Project on the Internet. The other is at the site where 3,000 Czech intellectuals were executed after being taken off a train from Czechoslovakia, supposedly for a rest stop. Visit was May 5-9, 1977. Sources: Larry S. Goldblatt, M.D., This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it [1999]
  • My Memoirs From Palonkeh and Baranovichi, Belarus, 1904 to 1922" [October 2000]and Belarus SiG newsletter article.[October 2000]

    photos. [February 2010]

    • "After the demise of the Soviet Union and the independence of Belarus a marker was placed on that spot with the help of a Baronovich survivor and decorated partisan commander, Moshe Zalmanovich. Mr. Zalmanovich, who is retired and lives in Israel, travels often to Baranovich, in part, because his wife Wanda still has family in the city. The two met during the war when her family risked their lives to save him. After the war, Wanda chose to follow him to Israel, where she has lived for the past 40 years as a convert. When the memorial was desecrated several years ago by anti-Semites, Mr. Zalmanovich helped pay for its renovation out of his own pocket." Source see photos. Copyright © 1999 Belarus SIG and This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it (both text and photos)

    • Photos courtesy Andrei Burdenkov/Facebook [September 2016]
Last Updated on Monday, 12 September 2016 20:35