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Coat of arms of Stuttgart 48°46' N, 09°11' E. STUTTGART (שטוטגארט) incorporating BAD CANNSTATT. Wikipedia. 1900 Jewish population: about 4,000.

CEMETERY:

Baden-Württemberg (Gerz, Peters).

DISTRICT: Stuttgart

LOCATION OF CEMETERY:

  • I. Hoppenlau cemetery, Rosenbergstrasse, Stuttgart 70174 (section of the general city cemetery)

IN USE: From 1834 until 1873 and occasionally until 1904.

NUMBER OF GRAVESTONES: 208.

DOCUMENTATION:

  • 1987/88 photographs of all gravestones, gravestone incriptions with translation of Hebrew text by Joachim Hahn.
  • 1991 photographs of all gravestones with mapping of graves by Zentralarchiv.
  • Numerous photographs of individual gravestones and general cemetery views in Alemannia Judaica.

PUBLICATIONS:

  • Photographs in Württemberg1932, page127.
  • History in Festschrift 1911, page95
  • History in Zelzer 1964, pages29-30.
  • History, grave register, cemetery layout, photographs of selected gravestones, inscriptions and translation from Hebrew of 16 selected gravestone by Hahn1988b.

NOTE:

  • Although this Jewish community began to exist in the 18th century, they acquired their own burial ground only in 1834, as a section in the general city cemetery. It is noteworthy that in the Jewish section there is a total absence of Jewish symbols on the gravestones, not even those of the blessing hands. This fact can possibly be attributed to this section being an integral part of the general city cemetery.
  • During the 18th century and up to 1834 burials of the deceased from the Stuttgart Jewish community took place mainly in the cemeteries of Freudental and Hochberg.

SOURCES: University of Heidelberg and Alemannia Judaica.

 

IN USE: From 1874 until 1945 and occasionally until the present.

NUMBER OF GRAVESTONES: 2.373 (in 1991).

DOCUMENTATION:

  • 1990-1992 photographs of all gravestones and grave register by Joachim Hahn
  • 1991 photographs of all gravestones and cemetery layout by . Zentralarchiv
  • Numerous photographs of individual gravestones and general cemetery views in Alemannia Judaica.

PUBLICATIONS:

  • History in Festschrift 1911, pages 96-97.
  • Photographs of Cemetery of Honour for Jewish soldiers who fell in WW1 in Württemberg1932, page127.
  • History, grave register, cemetery layout and photographs of selected graves by Hahn 1992.

NOTES:

  • As a consequence of the rapid growth of the Stuttgart Jewish community a new burial area became necessary, when the Hoppenlau cemetery (above) no longer had any space after 1873. Here again, the Jewish community acquired a section within the Pragfriedhof general city cemetery.
  • Following the closure of this cemetery burials of Jews from Stuttgart took place in the Steinhaldenfriedhof in Bad Cannstadt (see IV.below).
  • The cemetery contains a memorial in honour of Jews from Stuttgart who were murdered during the Nazi era.

SOURCE: University of Heidelberg and Alemannia Judaica

 

  • III. Steinhaldenfriedhof, Ziegelbrennerstrasse 23, Stuttgart - Bad Cannstatt 70374 (section of Zentralfriedhof (Central City cemetery) (Detail).IN USE: From 1940 until the present day.NUMBER OF GRAVESTONES: 271 in 1991.

DOCUMENTATION:

  • 1991 photographs of all gravestones with mapping of graves by Zentralarchiv.
  • Numerous photographs of individual gravestones and general cemetery views in Alemannia Judaica..

NOTES:

  • By the 1930s, when the area of the Jewish section of the Pragfriedhof cemetery (II. above) was largely used up, a Jewish section was established in this cemetery, the Steinhaldenfriedhof, once again being a section within the general city cemetery. A contract to this effect was concluded in the early 1930s between the City authority and the Jewish community. About 110,000 Mark was the purchase price.
  • The first funeral in this cemetery took place in 1940.
  • Since 1945 burials of Jews from the Stuttgart community have taken place almost exclusively in this cemetery, although in a few isolated instances the cemetery in the Pragfriedhof was still used.
  • There is a cemetery hall, located on Ziegelbrennerstraße 23.
  • There is a wall tablet in the cemetery hall in memory of the 6,000,000 Jews murdered during the Nazi era. A memorial stone was brought to this cemetery in 1952 from the concentration camp Föhrenwald in Upper Bavaria, in memory of the victims who died in concentration camps.

SOURCE: University of Heidelberg and Alemannia Judaica

 

  • IV. Steigfriedhof, Sparrhärmlingweg, Stuttgart - Bad Cannstatt 70376 (section of and above the City cemetery) (Detail).IN USE: From 1872 until 1941. Occasionally still in use to the present day.NUMBER OF GRAVESTONES: 272

DOCUMENTATION:

  • 1991 photographs of all gravestones with mapping of graves by Zentralarchiv.
  • 1992 - 1995 photographs of all gravestones and grave register by Joachim Hahn.

PUBLICATIONS:

  • History, register of graves, cemetery mapping and photographs of selected gravestones by Hahn 1995.

NOTES:

  • This cemetery in Cannstatt was put in place only after the establishment of a local independent Jewish community. Up to 1872/73 burials of Cannstatt Jews were conducted in the Jewish cemetery in Jewish section of the Hoppenlau cemetery (I. above) or in the Jewish cemetery in Friedhof in (Remseck) -Hochberg. Some of the Jews who had migrated to Cannstatt wanted to be buried in their original home towns and their wishes were granted. These included three children of the factory owner Otto Pappenheimer, who died at the beginning of 1865, as well as the optician and engraver Abraham Hirsch, who had lived in Cannstatt since 1858 and where he died in 1869.
  • The newly founded Jewish community of Cannstatt acquired an acre of land "Auf der Steig" at today's Sparrhärmlingweg adjoining the non-denominational City cemetery, in 1872. The original area was extended in 1915 (to the West) and again in 1929 (to the East). The latter extension holds only a few graves and remains largely grassed.
  • The first funeral took place in December 1873 of the 13 months old infant Benedikt Fränkel.
  • A cemetery hall (prayer house) and an adjoining mortuary were built in 1895/96 at a cost of 26,000 respectively 33,000 Marks (Sparrhärmlingweg 24). The cemetery hall is a single storey octagonal building with a dome-shaped roof.
  • A memorial to the dead Jewish soldiers of WW1 was dedicated in the cemetery hall in 1920.

SOURCE: University of Heidelberg and Alemannia Judaica.

 

  • V. Stuttgart airport Flughafen - Mass grave. DISTRICT: Esslingen.LOCATION OF CEMETERY: Stuttgart airport (in the boundary of the Filderstadt community)IN USE: 1945 only.

NOTE:

  • During airport construction work in 2005 a mass grave was discovered, which turned out to be for the remains of 34 Jewish concentration camp prisoners in Echterdingen. Three months later these remains were re-buried in the same spot in a solemn ceremony. (Report in the Netzeitung of 16 December 2005). Additional victims from the same concentration camp were re-buried in 1944-45 in Esslingen (new cemetery) see Hahn1994, pages 193-194.

SOURCE: University of Heidelberg.

(Researched and translated from German January 2009).

 

To see information and photographs of individual gravestones in cemeteries in Baden-Wuerttemberg, click on this link and follow the directions on that page.

Last Updated on Saturday, 20 April 2013 21:01
 
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