LUDWIGSBURG: Stuttgart Print

Coat of arms of Ludwigsburg48°54' N, 09°11' E. Ludwigsburg is a city about 7.5 mi N of Stuttgart city center near the river Necka and the largest city of the Ludwigsburg urban district within the administrative region (Regierungsbezirk) of Stuttgart. Wikipedia. Jews began living in Ludwigsburg during the 19th century. In 1884, a synagogue was built on Solitudestraße, destroyed by storm troopers during the November 1938 pogrom. Jewish population: 243 (in 1900), 187 (in 1933). In 1988, the perimeter of the structure was marked in plaster on the site. A 1959 memorial and newer memorial plaques commemorate Holocaust victims and extol human rights. In 1940, the Nazi propaganda film, Jud Süß, was filmed in Ludwigsburg, based on the historical figure, Joseph Süß Oppenheimer from Ludwigsburg, who was executed in Stuttgart in 1738; During WWII, the city suffered moderate damage. Prisoner-of-war camp Stalag V-A was here from October 1939 until April 1945. After the war, a large displaced persons camp housed several thousand mainly Polish displaced persons until about 1948. After 1945 until mid-1946, an allied internment camp for war criminals was here. The U.S. Army maintained a barracks on the edge of town, large enough to have its own American high school. The land was returned to Germany in 1994. On 27 September 2008, the first 12 "Stolpersteine" were laid in Ludwigsburg as part of a project by artist Gunter Demnig to memorialize individuals who perished under Nazi persecution. Demnig was back in Ludwigsburg on 7 October 2009 to install more Stolpersteine.

  • Encyclopedia of Jewish Life (2001), pp. 760-761: "Ludwigsburg".
  • Pinkas HaKehilot, Germany, Vol. 2 (1986), p. 106: "Ludwigsburg"
  • JewishGen GerSIG

71640 Baden-Wurtemberg (Gerz, Peters).

DISTRICT: Ludwigsburg.
LOCATION OF CEMETERIES:

  • 1. Old Cemetery - Meiereistrasse. (Detail - lower arrow) - immediately adjoining the City general cemetery.
    IN USE: From 1870 until 1917.
    NUMBER OF GRAVESTONES: 99.
    DOCUMENTATION:
    • 1989 photographs of all gravestones with mapping of graves by Zentralarchiv.
    • 1991 complete cemetery documentation including above photographs by the Office for Historic Monuments (Landesdenkmalamt, ed. Frowald Gil Hüttenmeister).
    • 1995-1998 photographs and gravestone inscriptions with translations by Hahn.
    • Numerous photographs of individual gravestones and general cemetery views in Alemannia Judaica.
    PUBLICATIONS:
    • History by Ludwigsburg 1989, pages 24, 38-39.
    • Jüdisches Leben in Ludwigsburg. Geschichte, Quellen und Dokumentation by Joachim Hahn 1998, published by the City of Ludwigsburg - Stadtarchiv - and the Historischen Verein für Stadt und Kreis Ludwigsburg e.V. Karlsruhe 1998, 783 pages, containing the history (pages 96-100), register of graves (pages 612-732), inscriptions with translations of all gravestones as well as some selected photographs (LBI).
    NOTES:
    • Prior to having their own cemetery in 1870, the Ludwigsburg Jewish community used the cemeteries in from 1795 in Freudental and from 1808 in Remseck-Hochberg ( Hahn 1998, pges 94-96).
    • This cemetery has a war memorial in remembrance of the Dead of the 1870/71 war.
    • There is a memorial plaque in the City general cemetery, close to wall separating the Jewish cemetery, in recognition of the victims of the Nazi tyranny.
    SOURCES: University of Heidelberg and Alemannia Judaica.
  • 2. New Cemetery - Harteneckstrasse. (Detail - upper arrow.) IN USE: From 1904 until 1944; 1954 and still in use today.
    NUMBER OF GRAVESTONES: 85 in 1989 and 86 in 1998.
    DOCUMENTATION:
    • 1989 photographs of all gravestones with mapping of graves by Zentralarchiv.
    • 1991 complete cemetery documentation including above photographs by the Office for Historic Monuments (Landesdenkmalamt, ed. Frowald Gil Hüttenmeister).
    • 1995-1998 photographs and gravestone inscriptions with translations by Joachim Hahn.
    • Numerous photographs of individual gravestones and general cemetery views in Alemannia Judaica.
    PUBLICATIONS:
    • History (pages 100-105), register of graves (pages 612-734), inscriptions with translations of all gravestones as well as some selected photographs by Hahn 1998.
    NOTES:
    • Following the closure of the Old cemetery (1. above), the new cemetery was established, which is now located in the centre of the City general cemetery.
    • The cemetery contains a war memorial in honour of the named six Jewish soldiers from Ludwigsburg, who died during WW1.
    SOURCES: University of Heidelberg and Alemannia Judaica.
    (Translated from German June 2008)
  • To see information and photographs of individual gravestones in cemeteries in Baden-Wuerttemberg, click on this link and follow the directions on that page.

Last Updated on Sunday, 17 March 2013 20:02