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KONSTANZ: KASHNITZ], CONSTANCE], COSTANZA, קונשטנץ CONSTANTIA PDF Print E-mail

Coat of arms of Konstanz. ALTERNATE NAMES: KONSTANZ [GER], KASHNITZ [YID], CONSTANCE [ENG, FR], COSTANZA [ITAL], קונשטנץ [HEBR] CONSTANTIA [LAT]. 47°40' N, 09°11' E, IN SW GERMANY, S BADEN-WÜRTTEMBERG, ON W END OF LAKE CONSTANCE, ON THE BORDER WITH SWITZERLAND. University of Konstanz. 1900 Jewish populaton: 565. Konstanz is divided into 15 districts (Stadtteile). The island of Mainau belongs to the ward of Litzelstetten, a separate municipality until incorporation into Konstanz on December 1, 1971. Jewish history.

  • Encyclopedia of Jewish Life (2001), p. 655: "Konstant".
  • Pinkas HaKehilot, Germany, Vol. 2 (1986), p. 461: "Konstanz"
  • JewishGen GerSIG
  • Wikipedia

 

78467 Baden-Württemberg. (Gerz, Peters)

DISTRICT: Konstanz.
LOCATION OF CEMETERY: Wollmatinger Straße (part of the City cemetery) (Detail).
IN USE:
  • Oldest part 1870-1945; newer section 1932-1984; current part from 1981 - in use.
NUMBER OF GRAVESTONES: Oldest part: 281; newer part: 91; current part 16 (as of 1994).
DOCUMENTATION:
  • 1989 photographs of all gravestones with cemetery layout by Zentralarchiv.
  • 1994 basic cemetery documentation including these photographs by the State Office for Historic Monuments (Landesdenkmalamt,ed. Monika Preuß).
  • Numerous photographs of individual gravestones and general cemetery views in Alemannia Judaica.
PUBLICATIONS:
NOTES:
  • The Konstanz Jewish community initially used the cemeteries in Gailingen or Randegg during the 19th century until 1869, until they acquired their own burial section within the City's general cemetery in the Wollmatinger Straße. The area was extended twice, in 1931 and again in 1981, by including adjoining sections. It is still in use for burials.
  • This cemetery was not destroyed during the Nazi era.
  • The cemetery contains a memorial dedicated to the destruction of the Konstanz synagogue during the Nazi era. There is also a gravestone in memory of one named Jewish soldier who fell during WW1.
SOURCE: University of Heidelberg and Alemannia Judaica

(Translated from German May 2008)

To see information and photographs of individual gravestones in cemeteries in Baden-Wuerttemberg, click on this link and follow the directions on that page.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 13 March 2013 17:23
 
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