YEREVAN: Print

Alternate names: Yerevan, Erevan, Armenian: Երևան. Russian: Ереван. 40°11' N, 44°31' E, along the Hrazdan River. Yerevan is the administrative, cultural, and industrial center of the country and the capital since 1918.

The Jewish Council of Armenia erected a memorial stone to Holocaust victims in the center of Yerevan. Source [February 2002]

Rabbi Gershon Meir Burstein, Jewish Religious Community, Chabad, 23 Nar-Dosa St., Yerevan, 375018, Tel. 37-571-968, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it :

Jewish history. The Jewish community of Armenia dates back almost 2,000 years. In the 13th-15th centuries, at least one Jewish community flourished in Armenia, probably Jews from Persia. Many Jews lived in the city of Eghegis. [March 2011]

"The largest wave of Jews arrived in Armenia between 1965 and 1972, mainly engineers, members of intelligentsia and military, and families of eugenics from Russia and Ukraine attracted by the more liberal regime in Armenia at that time. The Jewish community today comprises some 1000 individuals. Yet, because of an extremely high intermarriage rate among Jews now living in Armenia, some analysts consider the number several hundred higher. ... Today, approximately 400 Jewish families reside in Armenia. ... Jewish community of Armenia rents an office in the Center of Yerevan. ... The chairman of the Jewish community of Armenia, Mrs. Rimma Varzhapetyan (Feller). " Source [September 2002]

CEMETERY: Vayots Dzor, south and west of Yerevan. "Hebrew University Expedition Studies Jewish Cemetery in Armenia" NCSJ, 2020 K Street, NW, Suite 7800, Washington, D.C. 20006. Phone: (202) 898-2500; Fax: (202) 898-0822; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Web site. [September 2002]

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 March 2011 10:13