WILLEMSTAD Print

Jewish history. [Apr 2014]

Jewish community [Apr 2014]

Epitaphs in Jewish cemeteries transcribed by Dr. Isaac S. Emmanuel can be found at American Jewish Archive, 3101 Clifton Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio 45220-2488; phone (513) 221-1875: SC-13609 - SC-13613. Cemetery dates to about 1650.

Nov. 16, 1996 issue of NY Times (Travel Section): "Curaçao has about 5,500 graves." Source: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it r Schenectady, NY .

Cemetery has 225 tombstones of 2,536 persons buried there from 1668-1859 with sections for men, women and some rabbis. See Emmanuel, I. S. Precious Stones of the Jews in Curacao: Curaçaon Jewry 1656-1957. 900 Jefferson St, Hoboken, NJ 07030-2108: Ktav Publishing House, 1957. V, 584 pages, illustrated. S58B394 for cemetery history and plan, biographies including family histories, chronological list of names, alphabetical list of family names + number of members + eldest tombstone year, large bibliography, general alphabetical index, 15 genealogies. Source: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it :

  • Beth Haim Cemetery, Willemstad: The ancient Jewish cemetery at Blenheim, the oldest in the Western Hemisphere. Source: http://www.virtual.co.il/communities/wjcbook/antilles/index.htm - [link no longer available]: [October 2000]
    Source:: "The 17th-century Jewish cemetery "Beth Haim" at Blenheim is one of the oldest in the New World. Unfortunately, it has been seriously damaged by smoke from the oil refinery. [Site contains community and synagogue history. October 2000]
  • News article: story about deterioration of the cemetery. [Apr 2014\
  • New Cemetery, Willemstad: "The new Jewish cemetery in Willemstad is dominated by elaborately carved tombstones, including figures of soaring angels or marble busts of the deceased. Those who recall the Jewish commandment against graven images of human figures may be surprised at the presence of human representation on these stones. Some people say the use of human figures is attributed to the assimilationist character of Jews of Sephardic background, their custom of full participation in society, even to contributing money for the building of churches. But scholars today recognize similar structures in old Ashkenazi cemeteries such as the one in Prague." See website for more information. [September 2000]
Last Updated on Monday, 21 April 2014 11:18